Native son

Terrence Malick digs deep into America's past with The New World
|
()

The John Smith-Pocahontas romance has long been a cornerstone of America's mythical landscape. He being the original Man Who Knows Indians (an archetype sealed by James Fenimore Cooper in The Last of the Mohicans), and she standing in for the land itself: Embodying equal parts purity and promise, Pocahontas represents an ideal, a paradise. The myth of their doomed love speaks to how this paradise was won and then lost. It is a story that Terrence Malick – a writer-director whose work has always sloped toward myth and, in The Thin Red Line, epic poetry – has wanted to tap for decades and finally does in his strange new film, The New World.

The New World is the departure and even, perhaps, the failure that many critics were expecting from Malick's comeback film, The Thin Red Line. Despite Line's 170-minute running time, the writer-director's take on James Jones's panoramic World War II novel was every bit as entrancing as his revered earlier films (Badlands, Days of Heaven). The New World runs 135 minutes (the version I saw was actually 150 minutes: The movie was recut after already screening across the country), and, this time, Malick does seem to have sacrificed clarity and control for the sake of spectacle. Still, the movie is certainly an important addition to a powerfully coherent filmography. He retains his formidable talent for grounding his characters in a specific geography, and he remains refreshingly concerned with their interiority: Few movie characters have souls as deep as Malick's.

The writer-director's movies are all marked by a stark tension between hyperrealism and voice-over-laden stylization (a muted style being no less a style than a flashy one). Much has been made of Malick's heavily researched, no-artificial-lighting depiction of Jonestown, and, indeed, the naturalistic, cinema verité rendering of America's first colony is reminiscent of Werner Herzog's lightning-bolt Aguirre: The Wrath of God (though Colin Farrell's John Smith doesn't have a hundredth the intensity of Klaus Kinski's Aguirre). The film's opening, which conveys the initial landing with Wagner-fueled bombast, is suitably revelatory and exemplary of Malick's talent for lyricism.

With that said, there can, of course, be too much of a good thing. The depiction of Pocahontas and Smith's courtship is almost insane in its unrelenting camera movements, flashes of elegiac sunlight, and impressionistic footage of plants – the scenes almost seem a parody of lyricism. The real problem here is that Malick's aesthetic isn't reigned in by a tight narrative construction (despite its expansive running time, The Thin Red Line never erred from a carefully plotted narrative mechanism). This Pocahontas is more human than her Disney counterpart (both because of Q'Orianka Kilcher's performance and because the character receives a voice-over), but not enough to direct Malick's labored gaze. By the time the story moves her to England with eventual husband John Rolfe (Christian Bale) and picks up some melodramatic heft from the heroine's tragic arc, our attention has wavered too far for too long; the film's many digressive passages fail to materialize into a whole.

Also from this author

  • Georgian rhapsody

    'Discovering Georgian Cinema' raises the curtain on a vital national cinema

  • Rites of passage

    Three consecutive Sundays of Nathaniel Dorsky's resplendent films at the Pacific Film Archive

  • Light meter

    Top picks from San Francisco Cinematheque's third 'Crossroads' festival

  • Also in this section

  • Keys of life

    Jimi Hendrix and Nick Cave feature in two very different movies

  • Waltz work

    Tarantino's muse can't save Terry Gilliam's 'The Zero Theorem'

  • Joyous blues

    New doc spotlights the musical wanderings of Arhoolie Records founder Chris Strachwitz