Yeah Yeah Yeahs, all right already

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SONIC REDUCER In the best of all music fans' worlds, an album will grow on you like lichen, excessive body hair, or a parasite à la guinea worm, only with more pleasure and less arterial spray, I pray. You like it more and more as you play-repeat-play. It starts with an ear-catching opening track or appetite-whetting overture, as that well-worn pop recipe goes, and builds momentum until track three or four. That one should sink its little tenterhooks into you and refuse to let go until you listen to it once again or upload it to your iPod or whatever musical delivery system serves the addiction.

That analyzed, it's amazing how some bands, like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, can go from compulsively listenable to annoying with one album, Show Your Bones (Interscope). Too bad because the YYYs still stand out, like a slash of smeared red lipstick, as one of the few female-fronted groups to emerge from that much hyped, new-rock New York music scene of the early ’00s. That barely sublimated burden of representation, the YYYs' association with the Liars and the more artistically ambitious NYC crew, as well as the heightened critical expectations after the strength of 2003's Fever to Tell hasn't helped Show. Once the flurry of screeching, obscuring noise and rockabilly riffs are stripped away and the songs are spruced up in the studio, the poppier YYYs sound deathly similar to peers like the Strokes at their most singsong ("Dudley," "Mysteries"). O's slight lyrics are exposed as the slender vehicles they are her piercing tone, which cut through the distortion in the past, simply seems affected.

Even when O toys with teasing double entendre on "Cheating Hearts," confutf8g the act of taking off a ring with a sexed-up strip ("Well I'm / Taka-taka-taka-taka-takin' it off / And she's / Taka-taka-taka-taka-takin' it off / And he's / Taka-taka-taka-taka-takin' it off / And we're / Taka-taka-taka-taka-takin' it off"), the story doesn't go anywhere beyond the (again, repeated) lines "Sometimes / I think that I'm bigger / Than the sound." The entire enterprise gives up the reheated, ego-stroking aroma of Zep knockoffs like Heart. That wouldn't necessarily be bad, if those commercial rock invocations seemed to serve more than an ego that seems "something like a phenomena, baby" (see the key fourth track, "Phenomena"). This album feels like a grandiose, strident, ultimately airheaded mess all Show, no go.

“Fab Mab” flap

I was a humongoid Flipper fan back in the day, but, truthfully, I wasn't thinking too hard about the imminent "Fab Mab Reunion" show featuring the SF dadaist-punk legends and Mabuhay Gardens regulars the Dead Kennedys, the Avengers, and the Mutants. The reunion part of the show's name brought out ex-DK vocalist Jello Biafra, who issued the statement, "No, it is not a Dead Kennedys reunion. Yes, I am boycotting the whole scam. These are the same greedmongers who ran to corporate lawyers and sued me for over six years in a dispute sparked by my not wanting 'Holiday in Cambodia' sold into a Levi's commercial. They now pimp Dead Kennedys in the same spirit as Mike Love suing Brian Wilson over and over again, then turning around and playing shows as the Beach Boys."

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