ABCs and Rubies

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SONIC REDUCER A passionate music fan friend recently laid some curious medicine on me as we were hunkered down at Doc's Clock, watching our inexplicably enraged lady bartender toss one of our half-full beverages: My friend's musician ex had already written off his barely released singer-songwriter-ish album, because according to his veteran estimate, "people are only interested in bands these days."

Maybe that's why Vancouver's indie-esque artist and sometime New Pornographer Dan Bejar rocks under the name Destroyer. Still, it's hard to scan the music news these days and avoid single, solitary monikers like Bruce Springsteen or Neil Young, both breaking from their associations with bands and recording protest songs old and new. Bejar's fellow Canadian Young just last week offered up the quickie, choir-backed Living with War, which includes a song titled "Let's Impeach the President" and streams for free at www.neilyoung.com starting April 28 (leading one to wonder if the Peninsula's Shakey is responding to the calls at his onstage SXSW interview for a new "Ohio"?). Perhaps in an instantly downloadable, superniched, and highly fragmented aural landscape, there remains a certain heroic power in creating and performing in the first person, under your own name, while reaching for a collective imagination, some elusive third person.

Chatting on the phone, over the border, Bejar might not easily parse as a part of the aforementioned crew, though he musically cross-references urban rock ’n' rollers, stardusted glitter kids, and louche lounge cats, explicitly tweaking those "West Coast maximalists, exploring the blues, ignoring the news" on "Priest's Knees," off his new full-length, Destroyer's Rubies (Merge). Some might even venture that the late-night, loose lips and goosed hips, full-blown rock of the album, his sixth, marks it as his most indulgent to date.

And Bejar, 33 and a Libra, will readily fess up to his share of indulgences, in lieu of collecting juicy tour adventures. On tour he says, "I tend to go and then kind of hide backstage, get up onstage, try and play, get off, and continue to hide backstage.

"I'm not super into rock clubs," Bejar continues. "I just don't feel a need to make a home of them."

Just back from the first part of his US journeys ("We played 12 or 14 of 16 dates. That's hardly any. I think most bands would think that's psychotic"), Bejar does feel quite at home in Vancouver and will reluctantly theorize about Canadian music. "I think there's a certain outsider perspective that people might say comes with Canadian songwriters, like the states would never be able to produce a Leonard Cohen or a Joni Mitchell or a Neil Young just kind of idiosyncratic characters." But then he brakes and reverses. "But I don't know if I believe that."

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