Sunny side of the scream - Page 2

In a world of disappearing all-female bands, the Bay Area's Erase Errata turn in their strongest recording to date
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His band, Flying Luttenbachers, played nightly with Erase Errata, Lightning Bolt, Locust, and Arab on Radar as part of the Oops! Tour in 2002. "Every night I got to watch them play intense, energetic versions of songs from their entire catalog and also began to understand what a complex organism the band was, musically and personally," he e-mails. "Bianca and Ellie are a fantastic rhythm section, and Jenny is an LSD poetess and standup comedienne without peer!"
GOING OUT
Erase Errata's new, third album, Nightlife (Kill Rock Stars), is the latest sign of untrammeled spirit and uncontainable life in the band — and in the all-woman band form. Hoyston may personally favor a more low-key version of nightlife — not so with her art and lyrics.
Now a threesome after the departure of Jaffe in 2004 for grad school and a temporary stint by A Tension's Archie McKay on token-male vocals, the band has become both more directly melodic and more pointedly politicized. The echoing, droning, rotating police copter blades of the title track demonstrate that they are far from detached from their boundary-testing inclinations, but otherwise — while other bands of their turn-of-the-century generation have quieted down, folked up, or simply folded — Erase Errata wind up for an energizing, wake-up kick in the ball sac with Nightlife, aimed at those who claim that the underground has been far too escapist, evasive, or simply mute when it comes to polemics and art punk.
Borrowing American Indian powwow rhythms ("Take You") and sandblasted rockabilly beats ("Rider"), along with their more archetypal ragged textures ("Dust"), the band skates between the urgency of midperiod Sleater-Kinney and the honking dissonance of DNA, as Hoyston coos, "While you're too broke to not commit a crime/ Your federal government knows that this is true/ More prisons/ More people have to die" on "Another Genius Idea from Our Government." The group lets its anger and outrage drive the songs — allowing a Gang of Four–style frenetic punk funk to propel "Tax Dollar" ("American bastard, murderous bitch/ Traitor to humans/ So rebel! Get on the run") — but not consume them. They stop to study the world around them — be it the well-armed paranoid desert rats of "Rider" (which finds Hoyston turning the phrase "Where everybody has a gun/ Everybody has a knife" into a wildly western horror show of a hook) or the street-level violence that bleeds into the gender wars on "He Wants What's Mine" ("Hey Beautiful!/ Take it into the night, I'll walk beside you and steal/ Your life like a carving knife").
Hoyston attributes the tone of the album to her move from Oakland to San Francisco. "In general, I started to notice things around my city that kind of woke me up to national situations, when I think I'd been a little bit dormant on that front as well. So I got really inspired," she says. "I think At Crystal Palace [Troubleman, 2003] isn't as political a record as Other Animals [2001] was. I think it was more us being artistic and more me lyrically just existing in a purely artistic realm and not really thinking about, well, yeah, I am political. I have feelings and I can express them in art and they can actually reach a wide audience. I think I just rerealized the power of the tool of having a voice."
BIG JOKE
The band never had any intention of making their music a career: In fact, Erase Errata began as an outright joke played on Hoyston's Club Hott housemate Luis Illades of Pansy Division. Hoyston moved to the Bay Area in the late ’90s, where she began working in the Guardian's accounting department; formed California Lightning with her best friend, Bianca Sparta; and met Ellie Erickson (who was in Nebraska all-girl teen band XY and also later worked at the Guardian) and through her, Sara Jaffe.
"When Sara and I met each other, it was, like, 'OK, are we going to go out or are we going to start a band together?

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