Sunny side of the scream - Page 3

In a world of disappearing all-female bands, the Bay Area's Erase Errata turn in their strongest recording to date
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Why don't we do something more long-term and start a band together?'” recalls Hoyston. "You know when you meet somebody and you have so much in common with them and they're actually queer? It's a really powerful thing."
Even now, the once painfully timid Hoyston marvels, "I seriously can't believe I'm a front person for a band. It was seriously a joke that I was going to sing for this band because I considered myself an accomplished guitar player — not a front person, by any means. I think front people are really pretty or cute or sexy and all the kind of things that I don't see myself as. We were just making up songs and people would hear and say, 'Omigod, what was that? Will you guys play with us?’”
That dirty word for this noncareerist group — momentum — came into play, and Erase Errata discovered themselves on tour with Sonic Youth and Numbers, as, Hoyston says, she challenged herself "with, like, can I get in front of all these people and act like a fool and try to sing weird and sing good and get confident and maybe even feel aggressive, the way my bandmates were challenging each other with instruments? It's something that eventually kind of came easier and easier over time. And now I can sit down and talk to you."
The key to Nightlife's success lies, perhaps, in the fact that the band is still pushing itself, musically and artistically. "I think it's women's music," ponders Hoyston. "There's still something odd about some of the music we're making. It's still atonal at times, some parts might be a little awkward, some parts might go on too long. Here and there, things are like that intentionally. We still try to keep things a little bit difficult for ourselves to pull off live. So I think it's made for people who might appreciate an interesting take on pop punk, maybe."
Pop punk! Nightlife is still not exactly Vans Warped Tour material, though one punk godfather might approve. Sort of, according to Hoyston, who conjures her most memorable encounter with Fall guy Mark E. Smith: "I was a smoker back then, and Mark E. Smith walked right up to me and took my cigarette right out of my hand as I was putting it up to my lips and smoked it all the way down to the filter and then flicked it at me and said, 'See ya, kid.' In a really mean, mean, mean way! Then he went out onstage and did the encore. And I was just, like, 'He stole my cigarette! That's great!’ Because he's like an ... icon to me.
"I don't like him necessarily. I don't think he's a nice person.... He's a real jerk in general. But I love the Fall."
The gods can be merciless — and forgiving — though Hoyston would be the first to debunk any of that vaporous junk. Amid Erase Errata's achievements and her own multiple solo incarnations such as Paradise Island, it's clear she's no goddess. She's simply very human and just trying to stay active. "I'm just really into demystifying things for myself," she says. "I mean, if I wanted to be mystified, I'd still be in church." SFBG
ERASE ERRATA
Guardian Best of the Bay party
Aug. 2, 9 p.m.
Club Six
60 Sixth St., SF
$10
(415) 863-1221
CD release party with T.I.T.S.
Aug. 4, 7 p.m.
El Rio
3158 Mission, SF
Free
(415) 282-3325
www.elriosf.com

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