Joy sticks - Page 2

Bonnie "Prince" Billy and a big fat bowl of Froot Loops
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This time Dawn McCarthy of the Bay Area's Faun Fables leaves her imprint — her vocals echoing somewhere in the vicinity of Sandy Denny and Joan Baez. Under the gaze of Icelandic producer Valgeir Sigurosson (Björk's sometime engineer whom Oldham met while touring with the swan queen), The Letting Go is awash with melancholic melodic Southern rock and blues-folk, tunes that revolve around cursed love, child ghosts, and frosty wakes. Captured in Reykjavík and decorated with an image of Makapu’u beach on Oahu, The Letting Go doesn't sound on the surface like the product of volcanic island ramblings and rumblings — but its lyrics do hint at the tragedy of believing that each man or woman is an island.
That's why Oldham has gone out of his way to introduce performers like Newsom and McCarthy to his audiences. "Part of it is to reveal how interconnected things could be if you want them to be," he explains with a soft Southern drawl. "Part of it is also, if the world isn't going your way and there's a certain amount always of loneliness to do battle with, sometimes you realize it doesn't have to be that way. You don't have to be this solitary figure in the world." The yearning to connect, this time with an old friend, surfaces in Old Joy, a film by Kelly Reichardt (River of Grass), which has caught praise on the festival circuit for its rapturously, deliberately paced meditation on two men's slow-growth rambles through old-growth Oregon wilderness. Oldham's first substantial starring role since Matewan (he most recently appeared in Junebug), his character, Kurt, is a slacker gone to seed, soon to be homeless, and still in search of his next high, his next life lesson, his next brush with grace. After helping Reichardt brainstorm hot-spring locales in Kentucky, the man who could have ended up like Macaulay Culkin or so many Coreys — and instead laid down the blueprint for, one imagines, Jenny Lewis — accepted the part. "I knew Kelly was going to be working in a way I like to work, which is just like a full immersion process," he says, making the connection much as he pulls together Old Joy, his 1997 album, Joya (Drag City), Madonna, Emily Dickinson, and The Letting Go. "Everybody goes there. Everybody's basically on call.... The line between tasks is a semipermeable membrane. That's how I like making records too." SFBG
BONNIE "PRINCE" BILLY
With Dark Hand and Lamplight and Sir Richard Bishop
Oct. 30–31, 8 p.m.
Great American Music Hall
859 O'Farrell, SF
$18
(415) 885-0750
For more on Will Oldham and Diddy, go to www.sfbayguardian.com/blogs/music.

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