How Oakland's fearful politicos enabled waste: Part III - Page 4

Political, racial pressure pays off for the bakery

She testified more than once about the shortage of training programs for nurses' aides and said her own company couldn't supply enough of them. She urged Oakland's leaders to fund E.M. Health.

But Marzouk ended up on E.M. Health's payroll for the last two quarters of 1996 earning more than $20,000, city records show.

Marzouk refused to comment for this story, but she sounded surprised to hear that she'd once been listed as an employee.

In any case, by 2000, the company's business license was suspended, and by 2003, Alameda County records show, state and federal tax officials during the intervening years had imposed tax liens on the company's assets totalling nearly $200,000.

But today, E.M. Health's motto "Big enough to serve, small enough to care'' is little more than a failed promise.

MediaNews investigative reporters Thomas Peele and Josh Richman, KQED reporter Judy Campbell, and radio reporter Bob Butler contributed to this report. Cecily Burt is a MediaNews staff writer. G.W. Schulz is a staff writer at the San Francisco Bay Guardian.

Also from this author

  • Money for nothing

    Bakery associate received public matching funds but didn't document spending

  • How Oakland's fearful politicos enabled waste: Part 1

    How the bakery's $1 million vanished. Along with loan from city, pledges to help community disappeared.

  • 'He's not going anywhere'

    Newly available documents expose what happened to a man shot 16 times by SFPD officers two years ago