Youth gone wild - Page 2

Tir na nóg translates Edna O'Brien's debut novel to the stage
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Beautifully handled by Smith and his design collaborators, the play goes off-rails a bit when O'Brien imposes as ending a flashback-memory montage, with principal characters (including dead ones) drifting back onstage to speak prior best lines in echo! echo! echo! recollection. Yet there's a certain charm to ex-Riverdance choreographer Jean Butler's ensuing ensemble step-dance finale.

If the novel's Kate came off as a guileless blank slate — passively dragged down again and again by Baba's misdeeds — White fills out that character with impressive gravitas. Serafin is a marvel as the antsy-panted best friend who simply can't repress her disrespect for authority, or precocious aspirations as a va-voom mantrap.

TIR NA NÓG

Through March 23

Wed-Sat, 8 p.m.; Sun, 2:30 and 7 p.m., $40-$75

Magic Theatre

Fort Mason Center, Marina and Buchanan, Bldg. D, third floor, SF

(415) 441-8822

www.magictheatre.org

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