Endorsements 2008: San Francisco races - Page 3

Board of Supervisors, Board of Education, Community College Board, and BART Board of Directors
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Actually, that's not true — he's opposed to the Clean Energy Act. Other than that, it's impossible to figure out where he stands on anything or what he would do to address any of the city's problems. (An example: When we asked him what to do about the illegal second units that have proliferated in the district, he said he'd solve the problem in two years. How? He couldn't say.) We like Dudum's small-business sentiments and his independence, but until he's willing to take some stands and offer some solutions, we can't support him.

Which leaves Dave Ferguson.

Ferguson is a public school teacher with little political experience. He's a landlord, and not terribly good on tenant issues (he said he supported rent control when he was a renter, but now that he owns a four-unit building, he's changed his mind). But he supports Prop. H, supports Prop. B, supports the revenue measures, and has a neighborhood sensibility. Ferguson is a long shot, but he's the only candidate who made anything approaching a case for our endorsement.

District 5

ROSS MIRKARIMI

Mirkarimi won this seat four years ago after a heated race in a crowded field, and he's quickly emerged as one of the city's most promising progressive leaders. He understands that a district supervisor needs to take on tough citywide issues (he's the lead author of the Clean Energy Act and won a surprisingly tough battle to ban plastic bags in big supermarkets) as well as dealing with neighborhood concerns. Mirkarimi helped soften a terrible plan for developing the old UC Extension site and fought hard to save John Swett School from closure.

But the area in which he's most distinguished himself is preventing violent crime — something progressives have traditionally had trouble with. Four years ago, District 5 was plagued with terrible violence: murders took place with impunity, the police seemed unable to respond, and the African American community was both furious and terrified. Mirkarimi took the problem on with energy and creativity, demanding (and winning, despite mayoral vetoes) police foot patrols and community policing. Thanks to his leadership, violent crime is down significantly in the district — and the left in San Francisco has started to develop a progressive agenda for the crime problem.

He has no serious opposition, and richly deserves reelection.

District 7

SEAN ELSBERND

We rarely see eye to eye with the District 7 incumbent. He's on the wrong side of most of the key votes on the board. He's opposing the affordable housing measure, Prop. B. He's opposed to the Clean Energy Act, Prop. H. It's annoying to see someone who presents himself as a neighborhood supervisor siding with PG&E and downtown over and over again.

But Elsbernd is smart and consistent. He's a fiscal conservative with enough integrity that he isn't always a call-up vote for the mayor. He's accessible to his constituents and willing to engage with people who disagree with him. The progressives on the board don't like the way he votes — but they respect his intelligence and credibility.

Unlike many of the candidates this year, Elsbernd seems to understand the basic structural problem with the city budget, and he realizes that the deficit can't be reduced just with spending cuts. He's never going to be a progressive vote, but this conservative district could do worse.

District 9

1. DAVID CAMPOS

2. ERIC QUEZADA

3. MARK SANCHEZ

The race to succeed Tom Ammiano, who served this district with distinction and is now headed for the State Legislature, is a case study in the advantages of district elections and ranked-choice voting. Three strong progressive candidates are running, and the Mission–Bernal Heights area would be well served by any of them.

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