Endorsements 2008: San Francisco races - Page 6

Board of Supervisors, Board of Education, Community College Board, and BART Board of Directors
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He suggests raising the hotel tax to bring in more money. He supports public power and worked at the California Public Utilities Commission's Division of Ratepayer Advocates, where he tangled with PG&E.

We're backing three candidates in this district in part because it's critical that Safai, the candidate of Mayor Newsom, downtown, and the landlords, doesn't get elected. Safai (who refused to meet with our editorial board) is cynically using JROTC as a wedge against the progressives, even though the Board of Supervisors does not have, and will never have, a role in deciding the future of that program. He needs to be defeated, and the best way to do that is to vote for Avalos, Knox, and Ramos.

Board of Education

SANDRA FEWER

NORMAN YEE

BARBARA LOPEZ

KIMBERLY WICOFF

Two of the stalwart progressive leaders on the San Francisco School Board — Mark Sanchez and Eric Mar — are stepping down to run for supervisor. That's a huge loss, since Mar and Sanchez were instrumental in getting rid of the autocratic Arlene Ackerman, replacing her with a strong new leader and ending years of acrimony on the board. The schools are improving dramatically — this year, for the first time in ages, enrollment in kindergarten actually went up. It's important that the progressive policies Mar and Sanchez promoted continue.

Sandra Fewer is almost everyone's first choice for the board. A parent who sent three kids to the San Francisco public schools, she's done an almost unbelievable amount of volunteer work, serving as a PTA president for 12 terms. She currently works as education policy director at Coleman Advocates for Children and Youth. She knows the district, she knows the community, she's full of energy and ideas, and she has the support of seven members of the Board of Supervisors and five of the seven current school board members.

Fewer supports the new superintendent and agrees that the public schools are getting better, but she's not afraid to point out the problems and failures: She notes that other districts with less money are doing better. She wants to make the enrollment process more accessible to working parents and told us that race ought to be used as a factor in enrollment if that will help desegregate the schools and address the achievement gap. She's against JROTC in the schools.

We're a little concerned that Fewer talks about using district real estate as a revenue source — selling public property is always a bad idea. But she's a great candidate and we're happy to endorse her.

Norman Yee, the only incumbent we're endorsing, has been something of a mediator and a calming influence on an often-contentious board. He helped push for the 2006 facilities bond and the parcel tax to improve teacher pay. He's helped raise $1 million from foundations for prekindergarten programs. He suggests that the district take the radical (and probably necessary) step of suing the state to demand adequate funding for education. Although he was under considerable pressure to support JROTC, he stood with the progressives to end the military program. He deserves another term.

Barbara "Bobbi" Lopez got into the race late and has been playing catch-up. She's missed some key endorsements and has problems with accessibility. But she impressed us with her energy and her work with low-income parents. A former legal support worker at La Raza Centro Legal, she's now an organizer at the Tenderloin Housing Clinic, working with immigrant parents. She's fought to get subsidized Muni fares for SFUSD students.