To a pulp - Page 2

"One-Two Punch" stalks noir from page to screen
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From Serie noire

Similar in style to Thompson, Willeford forgoes the moribund poetics of Woolrich and the whimsical perversities of Brown for more straightforward prose replete with crisp plotlines, raunchy interludes, and sociopathic villains. Willeford's most popular novel turned film, 1984's Miami Blues (George Armitage's film version, 1990), demonstrated the crossover potential of crime fiction onto the screen at the beginning of the '90s, anticipating the mega-popularity of Leonard and Quentin Tarantino.

"ONE-TWO PUNCH: PULP WRITERS ON FILM"

Feb. 13–28, $5.50–$9.50

Pacific Film Archive

2757 Bancroft, Berk.

www.bampfa.berkeley.edu

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