Stoned love - Page 2

Kid Cudi brings "dat new new" to pop's Babylon

My middle brother was into UGK, No Limit, Snoop Dogg, and NWA."

Cudi admittedly slept on the indie scene of the late '90s that paved the trail for today's alternative up-and-comers. Unlike Mos Def, he didn't press up 12-inches and sell them to record stores on consignment. Instead he hooked up with a former Def Jam executive (current manager Patrick "Plain" Reynolds) and launched his A Kid Named Cudi mixtape across the Web's biggest music sites.

Currently slated for Sept. 15 release, Cudi's Man on the Moon: The End of Day (Mtown), probably won't disprove the notion that he's a suburban rapper who has experienced little struggle. But maybe that's the point. By not pretending to be a ghetto Horatio Alger, he's free to expand our view of blackness, and hip-hop in particular. The harmonizing vocals, the introspective rhymes, and the hormonally driven R&B (rap & blues) add up to someone who explores hip-hop as a state of mind rather than an inconvertible, street-anchored style. "My whole thing is expressing yourself in any way possible."


With B.O.B., 88 Keys

Fri/24, 8 p.m., $27.50

Regency Ballroom

1300 Van Ness, SF

(415) 673-5716

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