The people vs. corporate power - Page 3

June ballot showcases the lopsided struggle against big money interests

|
()
Who's holding the keys to your ballot box?
Guardian illustration by Gus D'Angelo

Yet Cressman said recent events could help. There's been a big public outcry in recent weeks over the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to allow unlimited corporate spending to influence elections, the role that insurance companies played in sinking federal health care reform efforts, and the way businesses interests are hindering efforts to deal with global warming.

"It makes people aware of the overwhelming role corporations are playing in dictating government policy," Cressman said.

 

TAKE OUT THE MONEY

A pair of election reform measures might help lessen the influence of money and political parties. Prop. 14 is an open primaries measure that Sen. Abel Maldonado (R-Santa Maria) got placed on the ballot as a condition for breaking last year's budget stalemate. It would create a single primary ballot and send the top two finishers to the general election, regardless of party.

Prop. 15, the California Fair Elections Act, takes direct aim at the corrupting influence of money in elections, creating a pilot public finance program in the secretary of state races for 2014 and 2018. The measure, which has broad support from politicians and good government groups in the Bay Area, is modeled on successful programs in Maine and Arizona.

"No elected official should be in the fundraising game the way they are now," campaign chair Trent Lange told us. "This is a way to change how we fund elections."

The idea is to create a model that will eventually be used for other offices. The campaign fund would be generated by a $350 annual fee on lobbyists, lobbying firms, and lobbyist employers. Currently lobbyists pay just $12.50 per year to register, which Lange said, "just shows the power of lobbyists in Sacramento." *