The Green Party's nadir - Page 5

With its numbers down and its stars leaving, a progressive party contemplates its prospects

|
(2)


But Mirkarimi and other Greens who endorsed Obama see this moment differently, and they don't share the hope that people disappointed with Obama are going to naturally gravitate toward the Greens. Rizzo and Kim fear these voters, deprived of the hope they once had, will instead just check out of politics. "They need to reorganize for a new time and new reality," Rizzo said of the Greens.
Part of that new reality involves working with candidates like Obama and trying to pull them to the left through grassroots organizing. Mirkarimi stands by his decision to endorse Obama, for which the Green Party disinvited him to speak at its annual national convention, even though he was one of his party's founders and top elected officials.
"After a while, we have to take responsibility to try to green the Democrats instead of just throwing barbs at them," Mirkarimi said. "Our critique of Obama now would be much more effective if we had supported him."
Yet that's a claim of some dispute within the Green Party, a party that has often torn itself apart with differences over strategy and ideology, as it did in 2006 when many party activists vocally opposed the gubernatorial campaign of former Socialist Peter Camejo. And old comrades Mirkarimi and Gonzalez still don't agree on the best Obama strategy, even in retrospect.
But they and other former Greens remain hopeful that the country can expand its political dialogue, and they say they are committed to continuing to work toward that goal. "I think there will be some new third party effort that emerges," Gonzalez said. "It can't be enough to not be President Bush. People want to see the implementation of a larger vision."

Comments

There is not enough difference between the Democrats and Republicans. Because, I live in very blue voting district, for the first time in my life I had the luxury of "voting my conscience," instead of voting for "the lesser of two evils." I voted for the Green Party candidate, not because I thought she would make a great president, but because I really agree with the Green Party agenda, and I wanted to send a message to the Democrats. I agree that Obama was a better choice than McCain, but only by a small margin. Both Democrats and Republicans have been ripping off the taxpayers, since way before I was born. The thing that worried me about Obama right from the beginning was his warlike and hawkish attitudes. We need to stop giving money to the military, and Obama never talked about that. I invite you to my website devoted to raising awareness on this puritan attack on freedom: http://pltcldscsn.blogspot.com/

Posted by Guest on Mar. 20, 2010 @ 7:20 am

I'm just so disappointed by this -- the demise of our cherished local Green Party, I mean. When I think of all the hours my progressive friends and I put into making this thing happen. And now...nothing. It looked like we had the world in our oyster during those heady days in 2003 when Matt Gonzalez was about to be elected mayor, but our worser angels appear to have gotten the better of us. Oh, well. I, for one, have not given up hope. A new pheonix will emerge, whether he/she be Green or not. And I'm going to keep working. I'm going to keep trying. My shoulder is forever to the wheel.

Posted by Mary Jane Prattlefore on Apr. 24, 2010 @ 1:55 pm