Practiced distance - Page 2

The elements of Paul Clipson's streaming cinema -- showing at SFMOMA

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A collage of images from Paul Clipson's 2008 Sphinx on the Seine, an eight-minute fantastic voyage

It's only in the concentrated shorts, however, that one finds the full extension of Clipson's lyricism. The elliptical Sphinx on the Seine (2008) is still my favorite. Only eight minutes long, its shots seem to trace a voyage. We see the golden gleam of the sun as reflected by criss-crossing railways and snaking waterways, the shadow-world of a sidewalk, a phantasmal vision of Mount Fuji. Each of these lucid views slides away just as it ripens. Clipson's collation of different cities is formally embedded in his composited images, which here appear as the fragile clues of some unknown existence. Like Sans Soleil (1983) and Mr. Arkadin (1955), two similarly itinerant films, Sphinx on the Seine evokes a tantalizing sense of placelessness.

One afternoon, both of us a little scatterbrained from a long week, Clipson and I get hung up on CinemaScope. He expresses admiration for the anamorphic framings of Ben Rivers' I Know Where I'm Going (2009), and then draws a zigzag of appreciation between George Cukor's 1954 A Star is Born ("The first 20 minutes"), Vincent Minnelli's 1958 Some Came Running ("When you see it in the theater, it's so much darker than on a television. You see shadows under people's eyes"), and Otto Preminger's general mastery of the form ("To me, those aren't even compositions; they're movements of thought"). It strikes me again and again that Clipson's acute observations regarding film aesthetics are very much part of his creative force — yet his filmmaking doesn't feel overcooked. Ben Rivers' films work in a similar way: betraying a cinephile's intimate knowledge of the medium, but out in the world all the same.

"Sometimes a few seconds of a film can live with you your whole life," Clipson tells me later that same afternoon, locating one such epiphany in the opening of Orson Welles' Macbeth (1948): "There are all these dissolves going through the witches' cauldron. You see a smoke circle, a storm cloud, what maybe is the surface of clouds from above, the cauldron and hands ... I could just make films entirely inspired by that for 10 years because it's so intangible, with such a beautiful, dense logic of images that resists immediate understanding." Indeed, it sounds like a Paul Clipson film.

"PAUL CLIPSON PRESENTS THE ELEMENTS"

Thurs/30, 7 p.m., $5

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

151 Third St., SF

(415) 357-4000

www.sfmoma.org

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