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Dam-Funk's 1988-'92 throwback Adolescent Funk captures the band in teenage state of sonic bumptiousness

JANE BIRKIN

Di Doo Dah

(Light in the Attic)

Arriving in the wake of Light in the Attic's reissue of the masterful L'Histoire de Melody Nelson, this, Birkin's first proper — if such a word can be applied to anything involving Serge Gainsbourg — solo album, is a series of light delights. Jean-Claude Vannier trades his characteristic dark orchestration for a string sound that is agile and brighter. On the title track, Birkin revels — in a melancholy way — in her tomboyish characteristics, setting the stage for more pun-filled escapades in androgynous amorousness. Elsewhere, she's a hitchhiker, a sidewalk cruiser, a hotel trick, a girl on a motorcycle, and other fantasy figurines. The most audacious song is "Les capotes anglaises," which begins with her blowing up condoms and letting them float off a balcony. The special treat is "Le décadanse," not so much a failed attempt at creating a dance craze as a successful erotic mockery of dance crazes. There, Gainsbourg appears for another classic duet.

 

DÂM-FUNK

Adolescent Funk

(Stones Throw)

The album's name is apt, as these tracks, recorded between 1988 and 1992, capture Dâm-Funk's sound and outlook in a teenage stage of sonic bumptiousness and lyrical lustiness. The content is spelled out in the titles: songs like "I Like Your Big Azz (Girl)," "Sexy Lady," and "When I'm With U I Think of Her," are a world away from the mystic leanings of more recent Dâm-Funk tracks like "Mirrors." Equally direct are the album's musings on existence, such as "I Love My Life." The sound owes a debt to — or is a youthful outgrowth of — the early 1980s electro funk of Prince, Mandre, and others. Dâm-Funk has been honing his use of analog keyboards for a long time — when it comes to Korgs and Casios, he's no new kid on the block, though he was back when these songs were captured on tape. The homecoming-dance cover art, selected by Peanut Butter Wolf from Dâm's photo albums, captures the vintage feel perfectly.

 

THE FLYING LIZARDS

The Secret Dub Life of the Flying Lizards

(Staubgold)

Flying Lizards are best known for creating possibly the cheapest British chart-topper in history, a pots-and-pans 1979 cover of "Money (That's What I Want)," distinguished by Deborah Evans' hilarious deadpan vocal. As the title hints, Evans isn't present on The Secret Dub Life of the Flying Lizards, nor are any other traditional vocalists — instead, main Lizard David Cunningham remixes 1978 source material by Jah Lloyd. The catch was that Cunningham only had a mono master tape to work with, rather than the plethora of tracks usually associated with dub. A lost gem from the early days of reggae-punk fusions and collisions, this album — with loops built from tape-splicing — reveals the dub underpinnings of Cunningham's brash and innovative work on "Money." An irreverent vanguard producer, he uses ping-pong balls to create ricochet effects on one track, just as "Money" seems to throw everything but the kitchen sink at listeners.

 

GIRLS

Broken Dreams Club EP

(True Panther Sounds)

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