Two's a crowd? - Page 2

Comical and existential, The Companion Piece explores life and love as a vaudeville act

Double trouble: Christopher Kuckenbaker and Beth Wilmurt are responsible for most of the high jinx in The Companion Piece

In the end, the bracketing of the play's action with a precise repetition of the headliner's act does not diminish this impression of infinite negotiation. The headliner himself boasts, paradoxically, "I don't open no shows, I don't close no shows." The lack of a strong narrative works to advantage here, as a way of further demystifying the theatrical conceit itself. As director Jackson suggests in his program note, the arc of a storyline is far too neat a device to contain all the indeterminacy and subtleties of this slipstream existence. The show goes on, as the headliner quips, "one night only — every night," even if, as my companion that night suggested, we all ultimately "open" and "close" alone. 


Through Feb. 13; $20–$40

Z Space

450 Florida, SF

(800) 838-3006


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