TV eye - Page 2

Anxiety of influence and smudged portraiture at CCA and Romer Young 

Douglas Davis is part of the Bay Area performance and video history surveyed within a show at the Wattis Institute

In the middle of the gallery, playing across what the accompanying brochure calls an "archipelago" of viewing stations, are various video pieces by La Mamelle and ART COM artists, as well as those by artists such as the Borat-like Olaf Breuning, whose work plays off of the spectacle of TV shows. Meanwhile, at the back of the room, Mario Garcia Torres' jarring 2008 nine-channel compilation of artists' TV cameos from the past four decades (Dali doing a car commercial; Warhol appearing as himself on The Love Boat) tabulates the increasing banality of art's intersection with television.

Yet despite the histories laid out in "God Only Knows Who the Audience Is," Bravo's Work of Art, YouTube, and the continual meddling presence of James Franco, video has yet to kill the performance art star — or at least the demand for the star's body, as demonstrated by Marina Abramovic's recent MOMA retrospective, in which the real attraction was not the controversial restagings of her greatest hits, but her daily physical presence.

The irony, of course, is that exhibit's online half-life, which continues today. The Flickr and Tumblr are still there. The artist is still present to those who navigate to those pages, even though Abramovic left the building long ago. God only knows who's still watching.



The title of German painter Christoph Roßner's current solo show at Romer Young, "The Hat, That Never Existed," is a tip-off. Roßner's smudged, over-painted, and half-erased depictions of things and people — trees, candles, top hats, houses, old men — scan as disappearing acts rather than fixed portraits (the way the canvases have been hung even suggests that a few have gone missing from the gallery). "Ghoulish" is the operative word here. Not much separates the faceless specter of Ghost from the skeletal visage in Grinser; and Roßner can make even a rock look like an Expressionist coffin. That's not lazy journalistic shorthand, either: Roßner's rough-hewn bleakness is of a piece with the Old World aesthetics of, say, George Grosz. The séance lasts only one more week, though, so act fast.


Through July 2

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art

1111 Eighth St.

(415) 551-9210


Through May 14

Romer Young Gallery

1240 22nd St., SF

(415) 550-7483


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