Bling and the kingdom

"Maharaja" at the Asian Art Museum and "The Matter Within" at YBCA focus on India's past and present

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A 1911 portrait of Maharaja Bhupinder Singh at the Asian Art Museum's "Maharaja"

arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL "Why curate an exhibition focused on a single country in an age of disappearing boundaries?" is one of the questions posed by the curatorial text at the start of "The Matter Within: New Contemporary Art from India," Yerba Buena Center for the Arts' survey of recent photography, sculpture, and video from the subcontinent.

One obvious answer is, "Why not?" The recent historic record gives plenty of reason enough. Despite all those "disappearing boundaries" and the wider circulation of art and ideas and artists around the globe, there is the fact that, perhaps with the exception of Chinese art, comprehensive displays of contemporary art from non-Western countries are proportionally much rarer in major Western institutions, especially those in the US.

There is also the issue of timeliness. Although India's transformation into a leading global economic player is not news, the impact that growth has had on the arts and the art market still is. An Artinfo.com headline asked only last week, "Is India Becoming the World's Hub for Internet Art Commerce?" (with the related article on the blue chip, Internet-based art fair, India Art Collective, making a persuasive case for "yes").

But the most compelling reasons for The Matter Within are offered by the art itself. Alternately playful and reflective, packing visual pop and demanding of deeper consideration, the exhibit's pieces are as densely-packed with ideas, portraits, and questions about what and who comprises as complex an entity as "India," and also what India's future might look like when reflected in its past and present, as YBCA's galleries are chock-a-block with things to look at.

This breadth is both "The Matter Within"'s greatest curatorial strength and the source of some of its practical weak spots, particular in regards to how it is installed. There is simply more art here than YBCA can comfortably accommodate, as well as intriguing omissions (why no paintings?). Different series by the same artist are spread across the space's two main galleries, something not explicitly stated in the wall didactics, which often address both bodies of work but are positioned alongside only one of them.

This is all the more frustrating since not everything in the show necessarily deserves inclusion. Sunil Gupta's photo-story Sun City, which recasts the heterosexual relationship at the center of Chris Marker's 1962 science fiction film La Jetee as a trans-national homosexual one played out against the backdrop of AIDS rather than nuclear annihilation, is a moving engagement with both the film it references and the shifting valences of minoritarian sexuality and desirability across borders.

His large-scale, multi-portrait narratives focusing on gender-ambiguous couples in the next room over, however, is less compelling and lacks the directness with which Tejal Shah documents the female masculinity of her transsexual and transgender subjects in the photo series and digital slide show, "I Am." Shah's portraits would've made for a smart counterpoint to Pushpamala N.'s "Native Types" series — in which the photographer appears as various Indian female archetypes culled from art history, pop culture, and religion— that instead are hung across from Nikhil Chopra's equally costume and prop-heavy, yet less conceptually tight, photos and video in the show's entry gallery.

Comments

I must admit that looking at rich people's junk is always fascinating in one way or another. For that reason alone, I was willing to take in the Majaraja exhibition. And while the glittering jewelry did not disappoint, I agree that the exhibition lacked necessary historical details. Even putting politics aside (which I don't necessarily like to do), the presentation was superficial and simplistic: an insult to the audience. The large wall text (What becomes a king...) was particularly silly. Once again, the Asian has gone the conservative route. Not only conservative, but dated. Even an entry-level art appreciation class would nowadays have as standard an address to some of the more troubling questions about the production of courtly art and the nature of patronage, etc.

I hope you popped upstairs and caught the Poetry in Clay show. Yee Sookyung's "Translated Vase" pieces and Meekyoung Shin's "Ghost" series made from soap made the trip worthwhile.

Posted by bulaklak on Dec. 31, 2011 @ 4:51 pm

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