What recession? - Page 2

Art Basel Miami, take one: Buzz outflashed protest at this year's beachside art fair

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A film still from Melodie Mousset's "Balancing power in fast-changing societal and natural dynamics (on stoning and unstoning)"
COURTESY SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS

However, the most exciting art could be found outside the convention center, mainly in the rapidly-gentrifying Wynwood neighborhood which now boasts more than 40 galleries (nearly quadruple the number from eight years ago). Many of Miami's biggest collectors have followed suit, setting up warehouses in the adjacent Design District where their collections are on view to the public.

"Frames and Documents," the Ella Fontanalas-Cisneros Collection's sensitively curated selection of Conceptualist art from the 1960s to the late '80s— which juxtaposed the work of Central and South American artists with that of their American and European contemporaries — was brimful with lush aesthetic rewards delivered with the barest of means.

I renewed too many loves that afternoon (and found some new ones, as well) to list in full, but another institutional stand-out was the Miami Art Museum's "American People, Black Light," a retrospective of Faith Ringgold's early paintings from the '60s that capture with unflinching clarity the anguish, ambivalence and rage of the Civil Rights era. Given Ringgold's profile, it's shocking that they've never been the subject of their own exhibition until now.

Much has been made of the "trickle down" effect ABMB has had on the cultural revitalization of Miami. (Wynwood is the most frequently cited example). The most hopeful and lasting sign I saw of any such change was a few blocks down from the Cisneros collection, at the small gallery Wet Heat Project. For the group show "A Piece of Me" pairs of art students from local high schools had been matched with four mid-career alumni from Miami's New World School of the Arts. Each student team then conceived, developed, and produced a video installation in response to a piece by their alumni mentor, with both the final video pieces and those works that inspired them on display in the gallery.

What could've been a gimmicky set-up resulted in some truly inventive, thoughtful, and original work on the part of the students. Moreover, "A Piece of Me" offers one portable model for bridging the community at large and the art community. As Max Gonzalez, one of the participating students who was on hand, said of his installation, "It was go big or go home for us."

Next to that vote of confidence, the Miami Beach Convention Center floor — littered with big names and bigger baubles destined for law firm lobbies and penthouse living rooms — seemed that many more miles away.

Matt Sussman writes the Guardian's biweekly Hairy Eyeball column.

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