The biggest burn ever - Page 2

BLM sets Burning Man's population at 60,900

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Black Rock City, shown here in 2011, is about to get bigger.
PHOTO BY WILL ROGER

"We think we could go to 100,000 if it was measured growth, carefully planned," Harvey said.

On the transportation question, he said, "it's a question of flow." Right now, participants arriving or leaving on peak days often wait in lines that can take four hours or more.

"We've talked to engineers that have proposed solutions to that," Harvey said of the transportation issue, although he wouldn't discuss possible solutions except to say, "You could exit in a more phased fashion."

Roegner said that was one of the big issues identified in the EA. "We are taking a closer look at a couple items this year, traffic being one," he said. Another one is the use of decomposed granite, which is placed under flaming artworks to prevent burn scars on the playa, and making sure it is properly cleaned up each year.

BRC was facing a bit of a crisis in confidence after this year's ticket debacle, when a new lottery-based ticket distribution system and higher than expected demand left up to two-thirds of burner veterans without tickets. The resulting furor caused BRC to abandon plans for a secondary sale and instead sell the final 10,000 tickets through established theme camps, art collectives, and volunteers groups.

"It's pretty obvious that we'll do something like that again because we don't expect demand to go down," Harvey said of that direct distribution of tickets, which was criticized in some burner circles as promoting favoritism and undermining the event's stated principle of inclusivity.

Yet he also emphasized that much of Burning Man's growth is occurring off the playa — in cities and at regional events around the world. "All of this is by way of dealing with the capacity problem. I don't know how much we can grow in the Black Rock Desert," he said.

Another realm full of both possibilities and perils — depending on one's perspective — is the ongoing development of The Burning Man Project, a nonprofit that BRC created last year to gradually take on new initiatives, followed by taking over staging of the event, and eventually (probably in five years) full control of Burning Man and its brand and trademarks.

"God knows, we have a lot of opportunities before us," Harvey said, adding that BMP is now focused on fundraising. "It is the objective before we transfer the event to start transferring the regional events, and that will take more money and staff."

After that, he sees unlimited potential to grow the culture, not just Black Rock City. "We've got to focus on the people. We're becoming less event-centric," he said. "We think of this as a cultural movement."

Guardian City Editor Steven T. Jones is the author of The Tribes of Burning Man: How an Experimental City in the Desert is Shaping the New American Counterculture. For reactions and details on the EA, visit the sfbg.com politics blog.