Under oath - Page 3

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Mayor Ed Lee testifies in front of the Ethics Commission shortly before being whisked away by his security detail.

After unsuccessfully trying to get Mirkarimi to admit to directing efforts to question Madison's credibility in local media accounts, Keith asked, "Did you ever direct anyone not to attack Ivory Madison?"

"I never directed anyone to attack or not attack," Mirkarimi replied.

Keith also clarified that Mirkarimi denies the allegation Madison made that the physical abuse on Dec. 31 went beyond grabbing Lopez's arm once in the car, as the couple has maintained. "It's your testimony there was no punching, pulling, or grabbing in the house?" Keith asked, which Mirkarimi confirmed.

Yet Keith said that given the totality of what happened, Mirkarimi should have known he couldn't continue on as sheriff. "Under those circumstances, wouldn't resigning be the honorable thing to do?" Keith said, to which Mirkarimi replied that it's a hard question and that he's doing what he thinks is right.

Faced with friendlier questions from his own attorney, David Waggoner, Mirkarimi apologized for his actions, saying "I feel horrible and ashamed," but that he was "sad and scared" to have his family torn apart against their will. He also said that he believes he can still be effective as sheriff because "what makes San Francisco special is our forward-thinking approach to criminal justice."

Longtime Sheriff Michael Hennessey — who endorsed Mirkarimi and continues to support him — established a variety of programs emphasizing redemption and rehabilitation, hiring former convicts into top jobs in the department to emphasize a belief in restorative justice that Mirkarimi ran a campaign promising to continue.

"Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would be an example of what this redemption process looks like," Mirkarimi said, choking back tears.

But Keith had the last word before Mirkarimi left the stand, belittling the idea that Mirkarimi offers an example to follow by noting how much probation time and court-ordered counseling he still has to undergo and asking, "The process of redemption doesn't happen overnight, right?"

 

LEE ON THE STAND

Under questioning by Kopp, Mayor Lee admitted that he doesn't have a written policy on what constitutes official misconduct, that his decisions are made on "a case by case basis," and that he's not sure whether conviction of a crime would always constitute official misconduct "because I've never confronted this before."

"Were you aware that many members of the Sheriff Department have criminal convictions?" Kopp asked. Lee said he was not aware. Asked whether he was aware that Sheriff Hennessey had hired a convicted murderer into a top command staff position (see "The unlikely sheriff," 12/21/11), Lee said he wasn't.

Lee's insistence that Mirkarimi's crime makes him unable to deal effectively with other officials was also attacked by Kopp, who asked, "Isn't it true that people get elected who have disagreements with other city officials?" He pointed out that City Attorney Dennis Herrera had nasty conflicts with Lee when they ran against each other for mayor last year, but that they're working well together now.

Kopp also drilled into Lee about his decision to bring official misconduct charges before conducting an investigation or speaking with any witnesses besides Madison — an answer Lee blurted out just as city attorneys objected to the question. Much of Madison's written testimony has been rejected by the commission as prejudicial hearsay evidence (see "Mayor vs. Mirkarimi," July 27).

But the public's perception of this case, if not it's outcome, could turn on whether Lee is holding Mirkarimi to standards that he himself — as someone appointed mayor on a later-broken promise not to run for a full term — couldn't meet. It was what Kopp seemed to be driving at before the bomb scare.

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