Fresh slices - Page 2

Gioia, Bakeworks, Del Popolo, Nick's Pizza ... a survey of hot new pizza parlors 

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Gioia's luscious roasted asparagus-ricotta slice
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY VIRGINIA MILLER

Suffice it to say, pizza is still the number one reason to visit Gioia — just as satisfying and special as it has been in Berkeley these eight-plus years. In addition to the pies, there's a classic Caesar ($9) with no visible Sicilian anchovies (though listed), merely a hint in the dressing. At lunch there are sandwiches, at dinner joys like fried squid with broccoli di cicco, spring onions, pimenton, and Meyer lemon aioli ($12), or pasta shells stuffed with ricotta, spinach, and nettles in red sauce ($17). The just-launched brunch (naturally) tops pizza with an egg, but also dishes up buttermilk flapjacks and frittatas.

As is typical, I prefer to go off hours, midday or whenever I can avoid the crowds already flocking here. No reservations means dinner hours can be rough although add your name to a waiting list and you'll get a text when you're up. Grabbing a slice to go is ideal any time as Gioia is blessedly open all day. In a city awash with world-class pizza, Gioia is a refreshing and welcome addition.

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Comments

Good SF pie picks. What about SF's other pizza truck? http://caseyspizzas.com

Roberta's has a wood fired oven.

Posted by pie lover on Jul. 11, 2012 @ 9:35 pm

yuk! If anybody tries to wood fire my pizza I know right away there is something very wrong. Just like when I lift up a slice and see a pattern in the dough indicating use of a screen (Little Star for example). It sounds like the folks with the deck oven have the right idea but the wrong toppings. Whats up with the guy who is making neopolitan at one place and Chicago goo pie at another? Unfortunately, SF will never have a real pizza place because it is too down and dirty for these rich hipster dorks. Please don't insult New Yorkers by citing Arinelli's as an example of NY style pizza. Victor's on Polk, by contrast, never gets a mention though they are an SF tradition since 1956 and make a fine (albeit a bit overspiced) slice of pizza. That's where I'm going.

Posted by Guest on Jul. 14, 2012 @ 6:31 am

as any I've had here. Are you really insulted? That's fine. Characterizing all of the city as "rich hipster dorks" is just dumb.

Posted by lillipublicans on Jul. 14, 2012 @ 7:37 am

Make yer own pizza, the sourdough leavening is free for all, right in the air, and there is a special zen in learning how to handle 68% hydration doughs to make the kind of NYC thin crust pizza where the bread is merely the least intrusive vehicle for supporting the toppings. My only regret is that my oven pegs out at 550F.

Posted by marcos on Jul. 14, 2012 @ 7:59 am

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