Rich Table

Don't pass up the duck lasagna: this new Hayes Valley restaurant glows with satisfying warmth

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The duck lasagna's a keeper at Rich Table

virginia@sfbg.com

APPETITE Not since State Bird Provisions and AQ opened towards the end of 2011 have I been as excited about an opening. Evan and Sarah Rich's new Rich Table is, kinks and all, even in the first month, well-rounded and satisfying. With efficient, informed service, reasonably priced wine list, few but well-crafted cocktails, a comfortable dining room with rustic-urban decor, and most importantly, a number of exquisite dishes, Rich Table is primed for greatness.

The Riches, a husband-and-wife chef duo, both worked at Bouley in New York and Coi here in San Francisco. Evan was also at Quince, Sarah at Michael Mina — and the couple hosted memorable pop-up dinners at Radius last fall. This fine dining pedigree infuses their mid-range menu. At other restaurants, dishes don't often surprise beyond a menu reading. But here numerous dishes are more fascinating than their descriptions suggest. At AQ, dishes are works of art unfolding in layers of unexpected flavor. At Rich Table, there's an approachable comfort elevated with refined nuances.

On the light bites side, everyone (and I mean everyone) has been buzzing about paper-thin potato chips ($7) with sardines interwoven through the center, dipped in horseradish cream. I'm a big sardine fan : these are not overrated, worth ordering every time. I brushed past Castelvetrano olives ($5) as common — thankfully a dining companion ordered them on one visit. Brightened by celery leaves and preserved lemon, the olives pop.

On an early visit, popcorn soup ($10) tasted like buttery, pureed popcorn in a bowl. Yuzu kosho (a fermented paste of chili peppers and yuzu rind) perks up the creamy bowl. Outstanding squid dishes ($14) morph with seasonal ingredients. The first incarnation wowed, the plump squid lively with watermelon yet simultaneously savory in black olive vinaigrette, dotted with crispy onions. This sweet-tangy, fresh-grilled dish was such a joy, I couldn't help but be a little let down by its successor: squid with figs, crisp onions and lardon draped across the top. The breezy luminosity brought by the melon felt a bit weighted down with figs, though still a winning dish. Crushed peas ($14) with California yellowtail and saltine crackers to scoop up is vivaciously fresh, but comes in a slight (i.e. miniscule) serving.

The menu is not easily categorized nor a copycat of anyone, but is packed with pleasures peeking out in unforseen places. Case in point? The pasta. I could come here for pasta alone (one dinner I ordered all four pasta dishes on the ever-changing menu). None shines more than a divine duck lasagna ($19). A smile crosses my face just thinking of delicate, melting sheets of pasta, layered with braised duck, light béchamel, and tart Santa Rosa plums. It's a glorious pasta dish with no equal in this town... or in any other. Other pasta dishes may not reach these heights but each is worthwhile, even excellent, whether rigatoni bolognese ($18) elevated by bone marrow and crispy kale or beets, or spaghetti ($18) tossed with Jimmy Nardello peppers and clams.

On the entree front, lichen-poached rabbit ($25) is heartwarming as it is gourmet, mingling with cippolini onions, radicchio leaves and broccoli raabe. Pork belly panzanella ($24) is the classic Italian bread salad of tomato, basil, cucumber and toasted bread cubes tossed with fatty pork belly, though I took to a hearty tomato-braised oxtail on toast ($25) even more. While accompanying grilled octopus and collard greens seemed disparate, the meaty toast alone makes it worthwhile, as satisfying as Southern BBQ.

Comments

"Other pasta dishes may not reach these heights but each is worthwhile, even excellent, whether rigatoni bolognese ($18) elevated by bone marrow..."

BONE MARROW? YUCK. JFC. How barbaric.
Pork belly? Sigh.

I want nothing to do with any "duck lasagne." I don't support the killing of an animal so that I can have a meal. If you had a pet duck, would you want to kill your pet duck too so that you could add him/her to your pasta? Would that be cool with you too? If you couldn't kill your pet duck to have ONE entree, why is cool to kill another duck so that you can "luxuriate" and have "a smile cross your face just thinking of delicate" dead animal.

There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things (the rights of innocent animals) as part of being a "progressive." These days, being a "progressive" means merely voting for a Republican with a D behind their name. Period.

In the past, I wouldn't have expected to see this sick shit on this site. But these days, yes, unfortunately I would.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 15, 2012 @ 5:18 pm

"There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things...." ??? There was also a time when we didn't recycle, have hybrid cars or be at the forefront of a modern farm-to-table, sustainable food culture, so what are you talking about? Restaurants - Chef's for that matter - don't condone eating pets. How many people in San Francisco even have a pet duck? Duck is delicious and are raised/farmed to be eaten. And, yes, if I raised ducks or pigs or cattle or turkeys or chickens it would be solely for consumption. Preparing and eating duck has nothing to do with being "progressive", as you put it. Humans have been eating duck, chicken, turkey, cows, fish, and pigs for millennia. In fact, owning a pet duck is more "progressive" than eating one.
If you're a vegan, which it sounds like you are, eat your veggies and beans in peace and enjoy your half-human lifestyle without ranting to everyone else about what scares you or grosses you out, sissy.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 16, 2012 @ 10:44 am

^ "There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things...." ??? There was also a time when we didn't recycle, have hybrid cars or be at the forefront of a modern farm-to-table, sustainable food culture, so what are you talking about? Restaurants - Chef's for that matter - don't condone eating pets. How many people in San Francisco even have a pet duck? Duck is delicious and are raised/farmed to be eaten. And, yes, if I raised ducks or pigs or cattle or turkeys or chickens it would be solely for consumption. Preparing and eating duck has nothing to do with being "progressive", as you put it. Humans have been eating duck, chicken, turkey, cows, fish, and pigs for millennia. In fact, owning a pet duck is more "progressive" than eating one.
If you're a vegan, which it sounds like you are, eat your veggies and beans in peace and enjoy your half-human lifestyle without ranting to everyone else about what scares you or grosses you out, sissy.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 16, 2012 @ 10:42 am

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