Rich Table - Page 2

Don't pass up the duck lasagna: this new Hayes Valley restaurant glows with satisfying warmth

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The duck lasagna's a keeper at Rich Table

Sarah Rich's desserts (all $8) maintain the comfort-meets-craft spirit of the restaurant from a bright melange of chilled melon to caramelized olive oil cake in strawberries, a heightened strawberry shortcake. Panna cotta lovers shouldn't miss Sarah's silky rendition with changing seasonal accents.

Wines are priced by glass, carafe or bottle, conveniently grouped in three white and three red price categories, with strong options like 2010 Christian Moreau Chardonnay from Burgundy, or a 2011 COS Frappato from Sicily. The cocktail list ($10 each) is short — no more than four or five at a time — and I've sampled six different ones. While some fare better than others (the Barn Wood, with Buffalo Trace bourbon and bitters, was a bit too musky-sweet from stone fruits), most offer understated elegance, actually different than other cocktail menus in simple purity.

The star is the lush, green Big Night, which looks like a healthy, green veggie drink, but is subtly smoky Del Maguey Vida mezcal mixed with nasturtium and ginger, topped with an edible flower. It's clean, strong, memorable. As is Land's End, the Riches' answer to a martini, using the incomparable St. George Terroir Gin, dry vermouth and foraged Monterey cypress. On the light, soft side, Let's Go is a refreshing sipper of Encanto pisco, coconut water and lime.

Sarah, Evan, and the engaged staff serve a warm vibe at their table in Hayes Valley — and an ever unexpected menu that focuses simultaneously on flavorful comfort and elegant simplicity.

RICH TABLE

199 Gough, SF.

(415) 355-9085

www.richtablesf.com

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Comments

"Other pasta dishes may not reach these heights but each is worthwhile, even excellent, whether rigatoni bolognese ($18) elevated by bone marrow..."

BONE MARROW? YUCK. JFC. How barbaric.
Pork belly? Sigh.

I want nothing to do with any "duck lasagne." I don't support the killing of an animal so that I can have a meal. If you had a pet duck, would you want to kill your pet duck too so that you could add him/her to your pasta? Would that be cool with you too? If you couldn't kill your pet duck to have ONE entree, why is cool to kill another duck so that you can "luxuriate" and have "a smile cross your face just thinking of delicate" dead animal.

There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things (the rights of innocent animals) as part of being a "progressive." These days, being a "progressive" means merely voting for a Republican with a D behind their name. Period.

In the past, I wouldn't have expected to see this sick shit on this site. But these days, yes, unfortunately I would.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 15, 2012 @ 5:18 pm

"There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things...." ??? There was also a time when we didn't recycle, have hybrid cars or be at the forefront of a modern farm-to-table, sustainable food culture, so what are you talking about? Restaurants - Chef's for that matter - don't condone eating pets. How many people in San Francisco even have a pet duck? Duck is delicious and are raised/farmed to be eaten. And, yes, if I raised ducks or pigs or cattle or turkeys or chickens it would be solely for consumption. Preparing and eating duck has nothing to do with being "progressive", as you put it. Humans have been eating duck, chicken, turkey, cows, fish, and pigs for millennia. In fact, owning a pet duck is more "progressive" than eating one.
If you're a vegan, which it sounds like you are, eat your veggies and beans in peace and enjoy your half-human lifestyle without ranting to everyone else about what scares you or grosses you out, sissy.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 16, 2012 @ 10:44 am

^ "There was a time when many San Franciscans cared about such things...." ??? There was also a time when we didn't recycle, have hybrid cars or be at the forefront of a modern farm-to-table, sustainable food culture, so what are you talking about? Restaurants - Chef's for that matter - don't condone eating pets. How many people in San Francisco even have a pet duck? Duck is delicious and are raised/farmed to be eaten. And, yes, if I raised ducks or pigs or cattle or turkeys or chickens it would be solely for consumption. Preparing and eating duck has nothing to do with being "progressive", as you put it. Humans have been eating duck, chicken, turkey, cows, fish, and pigs for millennia. In fact, owning a pet duck is more "progressive" than eating one.
If you're a vegan, which it sounds like you are, eat your veggies and beans in peace and enjoy your half-human lifestyle without ranting to everyone else about what scares you or grosses you out, sissy.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 16, 2012 @ 10:42 am

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