SF Stories: Laura Fraser

To keep San Francisco weird

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GUARDIAN ILLUSTRATION BY LISA CONGDON

46TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

People marvel that I manage to live in San Francisco on what I make as a freelance writer. They wonder if I have a trust fund, secretly write speeches for CEOs, or run a phone-sex business on the side. They figure I must somehow make over six figures to live in a three-bedroom flat in the Haight with high ceilings, hardwood floors, a big kitchen, and a garden as big as a park.

No: I'm able to be a writer in San Francisco because of rent control.

If it weren't for rent control, I would not live in the city I love, which has been my home since 1984, when I scored an apartment on Waller Street with one woman I'd met in a magazine collective called Processed World and another who'd just gotten off the Green Tortoise bus.

At first I wasn't sure I wanted the apartment. It was filthy; the living room had been subdivided into four sections with hanging sheets, and only cockroaches dared to enter the kitchen. It was $750 a month, which seemed astronomical to us at the time. But it was so rundown that no one had ever bothered to rip away the original wainscoting, Victorian cabinets, hardwood floors, or clawfoot tub, so it had a lot of charm under its grime. The landlord — an entrepreneurial hippie who bought about ten buildings when the Haight was at its most depressed — insisted we do community service as part of our rent. We pooled our money, took the place, and began scrubbing and painting.

Over the years, by sheer luck, I never moved. Instead, people moved in with me. I lived with a constant parade of roommates, most of them artists or people who worked for nonprofits. There was a drummer, a guitarist, and a composer. Maria was a young journalist from Mexico City who came here to write about migrant farm workers. Stevious was a political refugee from South Africa who worked at Mother Jones. Gail was a chef who left to join the circus. Natalie taught English to new immigrants. Julia was an avant-garde theatre director. Danielle was a filmmaker who wanted to make a documentary about Ghana, where she'd lived in the Peace Corps. Vince worked for the alternative press. All these people had moved to San Francisco because they wanted to do something creative or humanitarian, and to Waller Street, because our rent made that possible.

During the dot-com boom, my flat became a refuge. Two friends, a photographer and a musician, had been effectively evicted by a landlord who made life so hellish they'd leave, so he could raise the rent at a time when Mission rents went up 40 percent in a year. They had nowhere to go, so they moved in with me. It was a very San Francisco story: the guy was my great-grand-ex, who used to live in the flat above me when we dated, and now he was living in my house with his girlfriend. We cooked and played music and got along fine, until they moved into a flat they could afford — in Oakland.

Until the dot-com years, thanks to rent control, you could make a living as an artist or activist and manage to live in San Francisco, even if it meant eating a lot of burritos. Today, that's not possible, unless you're as old as I am and somehow had the luck to hang on to the second apartment you moved into after college. I may envy people who had the foresight to buy real estate in the 1980s or 1990s, but the fact is, I didn't have the money then, either, for what now seems like a laughably low down payment. Rent control is my equity. The neighbors who live in the mirror-image apartment in my building are not artists or activists; they are tech people, whose rent is double mine, and who do make six figures.

Comments

If you want to support the arts, why are you not giving your large apt. to the struggling family of the novelist so he can live here too and move yourself into a smaller apt or something a little more up to date now that you are making a living (NY Times best seller)?? Rent control is not the answer, it is the problem. People like you think you are doing something good for the city, while you covet space that is more than you truly need. If there was no rent control, the rents would stabilize via supply and demand and maybe landlords could maintain the buildings better and not jack up the rents so high, making it impossible for people who aren't rich or "been here since '84" to actually make a life here.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 20, 2012 @ 1:00 pm

I love how the techies comment on every media story like this one, telling artists who managed to brave living in neighborhoods that only they would have the guts to live in, in the 80s and 90s that now they're hoarding that space in these neighborhoods that are filled with tourists and techies complaining that they can't get in.

Posted by Guest on Nov. 04, 2012 @ 11:23 am

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