Injured player in the game - Page 2

After surgery, Saafir, the Saucee Nomad is left wondering whether he'll ever walk again

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The whole persona of a rapper is about being extraordinary, but in many ways Saafir's current situation is typically American, Obamacare notwithstanding. Like any rapper who signs to a major in his 20s, he bought "some dumb shit" with his Warner money and has regrets, but he always set aside money from his deals; he has kids he's putting through high school, among other expenses. But even with some insurance, he's lost everything, and it's impossible for him to make money the way a rapper does— always hopping flights to the next show — when it takes him two hours to get dressed.

After last year's failed quest for laser surgery, described in Shock's post, Saafir's again working with his original doctor to determine the cause of his loss of leg function. If it can be restored, he estimates he's looking at over $80,000 of uncovered expenses for surgery and rehab. If it can't, he needs to get himself into an accessible assisted living situation, because couchsurfing in his condition is untenable.

But wheelchair or no, Saafir plans to continue rap.

"I'm a boss but I'm an injured player in the game," he says. "I'm a very strong injured player in the game and I can still make plays from my position."

 

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