Privatization of public housing - Page 4

Many residents feel they're moving from the frying pan of Housing Authority control into the fire of developer and nonprofit management

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Sabrina Carter (foreground) ascends the City Hall staircase with activists who came to implore city officials to help rescind he
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY LUCAS GUILKEY

Lee added that funding requests would also be considered; those requests could total $30-50 million per year from the city's housing trust fund, according to Shortt.

To access that $180 million in low-income housing tax credits, development teams will need to create limited partnerships and work with private investors. The city wants to set up an "investor pool," a central source which would loan to every development team.

It's a complicated patchwork of money involving many private interests, some of whom don't have the best reputations.

Jackson Consultancy was named as a potential partner in the application for the development team that will take over management at Westbrook Apartments and Hunters Point East-West. That firm is headed by Keith Jackson, the consultant arrested in a FBI string in late March on charges of murder-for-hire in connection with the scandal that ensnared Sen. Leland Yee and Chinatown crime figure Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow.

Presumably, Jackson is no longer in the running, although the entire transformation is rife with uncertainties.

Residents often feel blindsided when management or rules change at public housing properties. And RAD will be one of the biggest changes in San Francisco's public housing in at least a decade.

"People are concerned about their homes. When they take over the Housing Authority property, what's going to happen? They keep telling us that it's going to stay the same, nothing is going to change," said Martha Hollins, president of the Plaza East Tenants Association.

Hollins has been part of Carter's support network in her eviction case.

"They're always talking about self-sufficient, be self-sufficient," Hollins said. "How can we be self-sufficient when our children are growing up and being criminalized?"

Public housing has many complex problems that need radical solutions. But some say RAD isn't the right one. After seeing developers gain from public housing while generational poverty persists within them, Gray-Garcia says that her organization is working with public housing residents to look into ways to give people power over their homes. They are considering suing for equity for public housing residents.

"'These people can't manage their own stuff and we need to do it for them.' It's that lie, that narrative, that is the excuse to eradicate communities of color," Gray-Garcia said. "We want to change the conversation."

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