Modern times - Page 2

Smith/Wymore Disappearing Acts take on communication in the digital age

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Code blue: Dancers improvise based on computer-generated commands in Number Zero (a space opera).
PHOTO BY BEAU SAUNDERS

The resulting chaos, surprising synchronicities, and piling on and unspooling of dancers was a treat to watch, even though many of the individual sections went on for longer than necessary. Some tweaking of the software seems in order.

Individual dancers caught the attention: Graham's silken lunges and snake-like torso; Wymore loping circles as if trying to create containment; Kao shooting like an errant bullet through the crowd; the tall, lanky duo of Smith and Heisters in an intimate duet considered "inappropriate," which earned them a "test." One had to sing, the other dance. Since both were out of breath, Graham croaked, Smith wobbled. Yet, much to our illogical relief, they passed.

Slowly but surely the "natural" world creeps into this "artificial" one when strobe-like images of cities and nature periodically cut through the black and white geometries of Nikita Kadam's visual design. When people sit quietly, they hold hands; couple formations emerge, and as the lights go down Kao and Heisters nuzzle close to each other from their space-age design chairs. *

www.smithwymore.org

 

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