September 11, 2002

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SF Bay Guardian Summer Sex Poll 2002

• cover feature



Civil liberties, R.I.P.
How George Bush and John Ashcroft used the Sept. 11 tragedy to shred the Bill of Rights and begin the greatest period of political repression since the McCarthy era. A selective chronology.
By Tim Redmond

The struggle within
An internal battle over tactics and control roils the venerable American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee.
By Camille T. Taiara

Turning terror into gold
The top 10 ways to cash in on Sept. 11.
By Cassi Feldman

Where to turn – and how to fight back

Last week's issue

• news

 

In this issue

Editorial: The lessons of Sept. 11

Opinion: The case against war
By phyllis bennis

Unplugged
Lingba Lounge is the latest venue forced to turn off the music.
By Corbett Miller

Out of the 'Dark'
Compelling new film sheds light on Potrero Hill power plant and its effect on nearby residents.
By Rachel Brahinsky

Into the woods
A trip up San Bruno Mountain to visit with Besh and Telma reveals more about big media.
By Savannah Blackwell

Hall monitor

Life during wartime

Alerts

• a+e - Fall Arts Preview

 


Film: Eastward bound
Hollywood scouts a new location.
By Chuck Stephens

Film: Attack of the clones
Stars overload this film season's circuitry.
By Johnny Ray Huston

Film: Art strikes back
Rep houses and microcinemas save yet another season.
By David Fear

Film: 'I Am Trying to Break Your Heart'
For those about to rock.
By David Fear

Film: 'The Last Kiss'
Pucker up
By Meryl Cohen

Music: Fall on your face
Great rock and roll, coming to a town near you.
By John O'Neill

Music: Heavyweight battles
Rap kings and queens battle for November reign.
By Johnny Ray Huston

Music: Cheap seats
Hearing classical music without breaking the bank.
By Becky O'Malley

Music: Messiaenic
If you're ready for all-Messiaen all the time, this is your season.
By Becky O'Malley

Art: Now, or later
The "Bay Area Now 3" show attempts to illuminate an anxious moment.
By Glen Helfand

Art: Expansionism
Art spreads.
By Glen Helfand

Art: 'Brut Love' and 'Grey Invaders'
Through Oct. 13, Southern Exposure.
By Lindsey Westbrook

Stage: Curtain call
The new theater season is upon us, and there's plenty to go around.
By Robert Avila

Stage: Stage highlights
By J.H. Tompkins

Stage: 'Mission Wall Dances'
Sept. 14-15 and 21-22, William B. Scott Facility.
By Rita Felciano

Dance: Alive and well
The fall season dance card is full of excitement.
By Rita Felciano

Fair game
Our guide to Bay Area fall fairs and festivals.
By Sophia Chakos-Leiby

Correct techniques
The usual
By Mosi Reeves

Last Exit
Our back pages
By Derk Richardson

The Litterbox
Outer space
By John O'Neill

Liner notes
No man's land
By Lynn Rapoport

Frequencies
You are aqui

By Josh Kun

Tiger on beat
Monster mash

By Patrick Macias

Script Doctor
O lucky man!

Grooves
The Mekons

Local Grooves
Nigel Pepper Cock

2nd time around
Velvet Underground

Local Live
Smoov-E CD-release party, with Andre Nickatina, First Degree the D.E., and Be Gee

The Mix

• culture

 

alt.sex.column
Don't quit your day job
By Andrea Nemerson

techsploitation
Boolean
By Annalee Newitz

culture shocked
The Lorax
By katharine mieszkowski

Dine
Inca do
By Paul Reidinger

Without Reservations
Tuesday, bloody Tuesday

By Paul Reidinger

Cheap Eats
Stayin' alive
By Dan Leone

Moon Signs
By Sally Cragin

The Blender

•extra

 

Web Exclusive Features

In the Public Interest
Credit scam: Why is Congress so intent on helping lenders – and hurting millions of consumers?
By Ralph Nader


Focus on the Corporation

Advertise This!: Corporations are gaining ground fast in their effort to assume all of the U.S. constitutional protections afforded human beings.
By Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman

Media Beat
The Powell Trap:
How the secretary of state is helping lead the U.S. into war.
By Norman Solomon

The shame of Hearst
Editor's Note
By Bruce B. Brugmann, 11.14.01

• etcetera

 

Superlist
Northern California film festivals

Anniversary Issue
The case for MUD: A public power agency could cut electric rates by 20 percent – and still make millions of dollars.