March 12 2003

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sfbg.com

 


Extra

Andrea Nemerson's
alt.sex.column

Norman Solomon's
MediaBeat

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This Modern World

Jerry Dolezal
Cartoon

It's funny in Kansas
Joke of the day


News

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Venue Guide

Tiger on beat
By Patrick Macias

Frequencies
By Josh Kun


Calendar

Culture

Techsploitation
By Annalee Newitz

Without Reservations
By Paul Reidinger

Cheap Eats
By Dan Leone

Special Supplements

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• cover feature

 

Spoon-feeding the press
The Bush administration's unprecedented war on public information – and how the major news media are going along.
By Camille T. Taiara

News you can actually use
A guide to alternative Internet news sources.
By Matthew Hirsch

Vanishing meetings
Sunshine-law loophole: City panel doesn't bother taking minutes.
By Savannah Blackwell

Partial eclipse
S.F. may have the best sunshine ordinance, but serious loopholes remain.
By Shadi Rahimi

FOI winners
Presenting the winners of the 18th annual Society of Professional Journalists James Madison Freedom of Information Awards.

FOI resources
A citizens' guide to fighting secret government.

Last week's issue

• news

 

In this issue

Editorial: Secrecy without end

Opinion: S.F.'s other obstruction of justice
By aaron peskin

No sunshine for CCSF
But chancellor agrees to discuss open-government issues.
By Shadi Rahimi

Hall monitor

Alerts

• War Watch

Life during wartime

Baghdad Countdown
On line for Bush's bombs: Life and death at the Daura refinery.
By John Ross

SFPD Request for Undercover Surveillance
Page1 Page2 Page3 Page4 Page5 Page6

SFPD Memo on Subversive Activities
Page1 Page2

Report by Office of Citizen Complaints
Page1 Page2

Media Beat
Censored: The big U.S. spy story: White House spies on U.N. delegates; U.S. media ducks story.
By Norman Solomon

War News You Can Really Use

 
• a+e

 

Demons in America
The dozen years between and Soul of a Whore have reordered heaven, the United States, and Texas in a world in which the fundamentalist things apply.
By Robert Avila

Film: Blithe spirits
Troubles are trifling in Laurel Canyon.
By Johnny Ray Huston

Film: 'Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony'
High notes.
By David Fear

Film: The road to hell
Irréversible – paved with good intentions?.
By Susan Gerhard

Film: In the dark
Yerba Buena sparks up the films of Wakefield Poole.
By Johnny Ray Huston

Music: Smoking pipes
Organs, Anton LaVey, and the mysterious "Georges Montalba."
By Will York

Music: Spiritual Machine
By J.H. Tompkins

Music: Gimme a little Sugar
Oakland R&B survivor Sugar Pie DeSanto recalls matching splits with James Brown, writing songs for Chess, and keeping up her own sexy grind.
By Lee Hildebrand

Art: 'Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition'
By Lindsey Westbrook

Stage: San Francisco Ballet
By Rita Felciano

Last Exit By Derk Richardson

The Litterbox By John O'Neill

Liner notes By Lynn Rapoport

Extreme Measures By J.H. Tompkins

Sonic Reducer By Kimberly Chun

Tiger on beat By Patrick Macias

Script Doctor

Grooves

Local Grooves

2nd time around

Local Live

Full Circle

The Mix

• culture

 

alt.sex.column
Why worry?
By Andrea Nemerson

techsploitation
I'm searching

By Annalee Newitz

culture shocked
Castaways
By katharine mieszkowski

Dine
BOB's Italian kitchen

By Paul Reidinger

Without Reservations
Noi pops

By Paul Reidinger

Cheap Eats
Cattle call

By Dan Leone

Moon Signs
By Sally Cragin

The Blender

•extra

 

In the Public Interest
Credit scam: Why is Congress so intent on helping lenders – and hurting millions of consumers?
By Ralph Nader


Focus on the Corporation

The peace message:12 Reasons to Oppose a War with Iraq.
By Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman

The shame of Hearst
By Bruce B. Brugmann, 11.14.01

It's funny in Kansas
Joke of the day

• etcetera

 

Superlist
Women mechanics and women-owned garages

Anniversary Issue
The case for MUD: A public power agency could cut electric rates by 20 percent – and still make millions of dollars.