Bruce Brugmann

PG&E's new attacks on public power

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B3: ON guard! PG&E is quietly moving on several fronts to lock up its illegal private power monopoly in San Francisco and keep San Francisco from generating its own public power and moving to enforce the public power mandates of the federal Raker Act. Rebecca Bowe reports on PG&E's ballot initiative that could kill community choice aggregation (cca) and kill public power moves in San Francisco Meanwhile, Mayor Gavin Newsom, who is running as the PG&E candidate for governor, put up Anson Moran, a callup vote for PG&E, to the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Read more »

Editorial SOS: Stop PG&E's alarming ballot measure

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And stop Anson Moran, a PG&E callup vote, from getting a Mayor Newsom appointment to the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. (See footnote) And scroll down to see the Rebecca Bowe story disclosing how the Transbay Cable would bring dirty PG&E power from a PG&E substation in Pittsburg to a PG&E substation at Potrero Hill. Read more »

Corporations co-opt local

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Click here to read this week's article, Corporations co-opt "local" by Stacey Mitchell.

Editorial: Dismantling the Newsom budget

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The mayor's cheery line may sound good when he's out of town running for governor, but it's not going to play so well on the streets of San Francisco.

EDITORIAL Mayor Gavin Newsom was upbeat when he delivered his budget proposal last week. It won't be that bad, he told everyone — "At the end of the day, it's a math problem."

Well, actually, it's not. Read more »

Economic snapshot for July 2009

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Economic snapshot for July 2009

By Christian E. Weller

We are learning the hard way that Wall Street, the economy, and the labor market are three separate things. While Wall Street enjoyed a bright spring, the economy continues to struggle, and job losses still mount.

The economy may be nearing its bottom, but it hasn’t reached it yet. Job growth won’t resume until the economy has turned the corner for good, no matter what Wall Street hopes for. Read more »

Stiglitz: America’s Socialism for the Rich

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Here is our monthly installment of Joseph E. Stiglitz's Unconventional Economic Wisdom column from the Project Syndicate news series. Stiglitz is a professor of economics at Columbia University, and recipient of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, is co-author, with Linda Bilmes, of The Three Trillion Dollar War: The True Costs of the Iraq Conflict.

America’s Socialism for the Rich

By Joseph E. Read more »

Dick Meister: Jack Henning's lifelong crusade

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Jack Henning crusaded on behalf of those who do the work of the world and against those who exploit them

By Dick Meister

(Dick Meister has covered labor and political issues in California for a half-century as a reporter, editor, author and commentator. To read a sampling from Jack Henning's writings and speeches, click here)

California lost a remarkable public figure with the death of John F. Henning
on June 4 at age 93. Labor leader, government official, ambassador. Read more »

Dick Meister: Slavery and Segregation

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It was racism that in 1935 kept farm workers and domestics from being granted protection of U.S. labor law

By Dick Meister

(Dick Meister, a San Francisco-based journalist, has covered labor and political issues for a half-century as a print, broadcast and online reporter, editor and commentator.)

It's been three-quarters of a century since enactment of the National Labor Relations Act that grants U.S. Read more »

FAIR: Misquoting Sotomayor

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B3: It's always helpful to read how FAIR analyzes how the mainstream media cover a major story. FAIR is the media advocacy organization Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting.

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Misquoting Sotomayor
Media let right-wing critics frame debate

At this point, the confirmation battle over Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor will hinge in part on whether the media want to fact-check her critics. Read more »

Editorial: How to repeal Prop. 8

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Follow Harvey Milk's advice: the more Californians meet and interact with openly gay and lesbian people, the less likely voters will be to sanction discrimination

When the late Sup. Harvey Milk was fighting to defeat the Briggs Initiative, a statewide ballot measure that would have barred gay people from teaching in public schools, he repeatedly made the point that the more Californians met and interacted with openly gay and lesbian people, the less likely the voters would be to sanction discrimination. Read more »