Cheryl Eddy

Action franchise junkie Vin Diesel returns ... and more new movies!

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Who dares to challenge the box-office supremacy of Vin Diesel, who returns yet again to play the titular night vision-gifted (but really socially awkward) escaped con in sci-fi actioner Riddick?

For masochists, there's Brian De Palma's latest, Passion, which checks in for a brief Castro run (Dennis Harvey gets bored talking about it here); there are also a couple of docs, a MILF drama, and a South Korean disaster-by-numbers flick about a disease that, shockingly, doesn't spawn zombies, just bloody coughs and rapid death. Read on for our short takes (and take note of your best-bet new flick: "charming seriocomedy" Afternoon Delight). Read more »

Elegant alchemy

 Happy accidents, strange coincidences, unexplained phenomena: Catching up with dark chanteuse Jill Tracy

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cheryl@sfbg.com

MUSIC Though San Francisco musician Jill Tracy is deeply fond of the macabre, "gloomy" is not an accurate word to describe her personality. The day I speak to her, she's in exceptionally high spirits, having just wrapped up a hugely successful Kickstarter campaign.Read more »

Fall films to look forward too ... and new movies to see tonight!

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Click this way for my Fall Film Preview, presented as part of this weeks Fall Arts spectacular. With bonus photo of Bradley Cooper's Brady perm!

Read on for this week's openings, including one of the best indie films of the year, the latest from Wong Kar-Wai, and, uh...the One Direction movie.

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Silver screen playbook

FALL ARTS: FILM Hustlers, slaves, anchormen, and Nebraskans -- Hollywood and rep-house picks for the season ahead

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FALL ARTS In the Bay Area film scene, the volume is pretty much turned all the way up, all year 'round. But fall is particularly jam-packed: we've got more festivals and art-house events than we know what to do with — and coupled with the buzzy Hollywood stuff, film fans best prep for a solid diet of popcorn until New Year's Eve. Or you could pick and choose the events and openings that excite you the most, using my multi-point plan as a jumping-off point.Read more »

The robot apocalypse, Mr. Darcy, outlaws, and revolutionaries: new movies!

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Let's Boo-Boo! Edgar Wright's latest bromance-in-genre-clothing, The World's End, opens today, and it's a riot. Elsewhere, there's a rom-com about Jane Austen obsessives, Hollywood's latest supernatural-teen fantasy, and an indie horror flick critic Dennis Harvey calls "a very bloody good ride." (Check out those reviews below).

Longer features this week include my interview with director David Lowery about his neo-Western Ain't Them Bodies Saints, and Harvey's take on artist-couple doc Cutie and the Boxer. Read more »

Lone stars

Old-fashioned 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' claims a new genre: neo-neo-Western noir

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FILM "This was in Texas," reads the hand-lettered opening of Ain't Them Bodies Saints. It's a fittingly homespun beginning to a film that pays painstaking homage to bygone-era cinema. After its Sundance Film Festival premiere, writer-director David Lowery's first high-profile release earned frequent comparisons to 1970s works by Robert Altman and Terrence Malick. That's no accident; Saints openly feasts upon the decade's intimate, sun-burnished neo-Westerns.Read more »

Flyin' high

Oakland metal faves Ovvl keep it (almost) all in the family with a new album and upcoming tours

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cheryl@sfbg.com

MUSIC If you've been to a local metal show in recent months, chances are Ovvl was on the bill. If not, there was probably an Ovvl member standing next to you in the crowd. But hesher, stop now if you've been taking 'em for granted. With a new album and tours on the horizon, the four-piece is about to be mighty scarce around these parts.Read more »

Never enough hours in the weekend to see all these NEW MOVIES

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Quite a few openings this week, although it seems like 10-plus new movies is becoming the norm these days. (At least there's no big film festival to distract you from the regular ol' cinema at the moment.) In the spirit of efficiency I did a combo-platter review of sci-fi chiller Europa Report; Johnnie To's latest, Drug War; Tenebre, a 1982 Dario Argento giallo that's screening at the Roxie tonight; and doc Adjust Your Tracking: The Untold Story of the VHS Collector, which plays the Balboa. Also at length, Dennis Harvey takes a look at Shirley Clarke's freshly restored 1967 doc Portrait of Jason, also screening at the Roxie.

Ain't enough for you? Read on for Kick-Ass 2, Jobs, and more on the week's fresh crop of flicks.

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Midsummer mayhem

From Jupiter's moon to a Chinese drug war: four beyond-the-mainstream treats for genre film fans

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM It's been a zzz summer at the multiplex. The number one movie of the year is Iron Man 3, a highly unmemorable blockbuster. (Quick: Who played the villain? Had to think about it for a second, didn't you?) With the exception of The Heat and The Conjuring, most everything that's grossed a crap-ton of dollars recently is either a sequel or based on some well-worn property.Read more »

The killer inside me

Film: Jawdropping 'The Act of Killing' examines the psychological effects of mass murder without remorse 

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM What does Anwar Congo — a man who has brutally strangled hundreds of people with piano wire — dream about?

As Joshua Oppenheimer's Indonesia-set documentary The Act of Killing discovers, there's a thin line between a guilty conscience and a haunted psyche, especially for an admitted killer who's never been held accountable for anything. In fact, Congo has lived as a hero in North Sumatra for decades — along with hundreds of others who participated in the country's ruthless anti-communist purge in the mid-1960s.Read more »