Cheryl Eddy

Rep Clock

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Schedules are for Wed/13-Tue/19 except where noted. Director and year are given when available. Double features marked with a •. All times pm unless otherwise specified.

ARTISTS' TELEVISION ACCESS 992 Valencia, SF; www.atasite.org. $6. "Periwinkle Cinema: recLAmation with live narration by Hilary Goldberg," Wed, 8. "Dirty Looks NYC Presents:" "Pickle Surprise! The Eyes of Tom Rubnitz," Fri, 8. "Short Films About Sexuality: Fourplay," Sat, 8:30. Read more »

Silents are golden

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The 2013 San Francisco Silent Film Festival isn't until July, but the fest's Silent Winter offshoot offers a day packed full of classic delights to tide over its legions of fans until summer. Sat/16, Castro Theatre plays host to four features and one shorts program, all of which boast live musical accompaniment.

Silent Winter's earliest (1916) and latest films (1927) are both buoyed by charismatic leading ladies: Marguerite Clark, in J. Searle Dawley's Snow White, and Mary Pickford in Sam Taylor's My Best Girl. Clark, who found early fame as a Broadway star, was already in her 30s by the time film acting became a viable career option. No matter — she's believably girlish as the princess with "skin white as snow," hated by her jealous stepmother, whose own beauty comes courtesy of witchcraft. (Dig the proto-Witchiepoo who helps the conniving queen in her various evil schemes, and her giant kitty helper, too.) A teenage Walt Disney saw the film in 1917 and made animation history with the same story 20 years later — though his version of the fairy-tale heroine lacks Clark's easy effervescence.

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SF IndieFest, and a whole lot more: new movies!

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First things first: the San Francisco Independent Film Festival kicked off last night and runs through Feb. 21 at various venues (mostly the Roxie). Check out my interviews with local shorts directors here, and some top picks throughout the festival here.

Also this week: cult director Don Coscarelli's John Dies at the End (my chat with Mr. Bubba Ho-Tep here), Amy Berg's West Memphis Three doc, West of Memphis (check out Nicole Gluckstern's review here), and the Vortex Room's love-ly new series (Dennis Harvey's take here).

What's more, 1986 action classic Top Gun gets the 3D IMAX re-release treatment (because any list of things that are better when they're bigger, louder, and more in-yo-face include Soviet MiGs, Tom Cruise's teeth, and Kenny Loggins jams). Reviews of comedies Identity Thief and Shanghai Calling, plus Steven Soderbergh's maybe-swan song Side Effects, below the jump.

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Six pack

Short takes on IndieFest standouts

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Antiviral (Brandon Cronenberg, Canada, 2012) Yes, that Cronenberg. The spawn of veteran filmmaker David makes an auspicious feature debut with this, uh, Cronenberg-esque body-horror tale. In the stark, gloomy near-future, celebrity worship has become so out of control that healthy people visit special clinics to be injected with diseases gathered from superstars. Read more »

Muppets, manholes, and mayhem

Local filmmakers screen eyepopping shorts at IndieFest

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Vincent Gargiulo is originally from Stockton and lives in San Francisco, but I spoke with him over the phone from Duluth, Minn., where he's about to start filming his latest project, Duluth is Horrible. "So far, it's actually lovely," he admits. "But Duluth is Lovely, nobody wants to watch that movie."Read more »

Rep Clock

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Schedules are for Wed/6-Tue/12 except where noted. Director and year are given when available. Double features marked with a •. All times pm unless otherwise specified.

ARTISTS' TELEVISION ACCESS 992 Valencia, SF; www.atasite.org. $15-50. "Cast Shadows," sound-film performances with Barn Owl, Marielle Jakobsons, John Davis, Jefre Cantu-Ledesma, and Paul Clipson, Sat, 8. Benefit for ATA. Read more »

Weird tales

Filmmaker Don Coscarelli on Elvis, Bigfoot, and 'John Dies at the End'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM It was a particular thrill to talk to Don Coscarelli on Jan. 8 — Elvis' birthday. He is, after all, the guy who made 2002's Bubba Ho-Tep, which imagined an elderly version of the King fighting the evil mummy that's menacing his nursing home. Coscarelli's other credits include 1979's Phantasm (and its 1988, '94, and '98 sequels), 1982's The Beastmaster, and his latest: supernatural noir buddy comedy John Dies at the End, based on David Wong's comedy-horror novel.Read more »

Kier-La Janisse on "House of Psychotic Women" and IndieFest

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I first heard of Kier-La Janisse when a film she'd compiled, Metal Storm: The Scandinavian Black Metal Wars, screened at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in 2005.

That would be a rad enough reason to want to read her new book, House of Psychotic Women: An Autobiographical Topography of Female Neurosis in Horror and Exploitation Films (FAB Press, 360pp., $29.95), but the Canadian dynamo's resume doesn't stop (or start) there: she's also the creator of Vancouver's late, great CineMuerte Horror Film Festival; co-founder of Montreal's Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies and the Blue Sunshine Psychotronic Film Centre; has programmed at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Austin, Tex.; was the subject of the 2004 doc Celluloid Horror; and has written or contributed to too many film magazines and books to list here. (One of them is Fangoria, though.)

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Stallone, Walken, zombies, Oscar shorts, and more: new movies!

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Yes you can find time to see a movie this otherwise football-y weekend. The ongoing Noir City and Sketchfest still have a lot of great upcoming programming, Sly Stallone is back in evocatively-titled action flick Bullet to the Head, a zombie finds love in Warm Bodies (review below), and all the Academy Award-nominated shorts are now available for big-screen viewing, for anyone who takes winning the office Oscar pool as seriously as ... the Superbowl.

And speaking of the big game, the Roxie will be hosting its annual "Men in Tights" viewing party, a benefit for the theater and the upcoming SF IndieFest. So you can have your pigskin, and eat your popcorn too. GO NINERS!

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Triumph of the Wiener Dog

Indie icon Heather Matarazzo talks 'Welcome to the Dollhouse'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Everyone's got a little Dawn Wiener in them. Dressed in deceptively cheerful floral prints, the tweenage heroine of 1995's Welcome to the Dollhouse trudges through the hell that is junior high, where cruel bullies lurk in the girls' room ("Why do you hate me?" "Because you're ugly"), the cafeteria is full of cold shoulders and catty cheerleaders, and parents and teachers just don't understand.Read more »