Cheryl Eddy

Speed demons!

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Driving out to Altamont Motorsports Park on the night after a full moon, just a few days before Halloween, even my metal-maimed eardrums could faintly hear the sound of Mick Jagger's famous plea for peace, uttered from the Altamont concert stage in 1970's Gimme Shelter: "Who's fighting, and what for?"

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The cars that go boom.

Well, I'll tell ya, fighting Read more »

Darling Nikki

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Don't try to front like you never liked Motley Crue. You know you shouted at the devil. You know you tapped out the poignant opening bars of "Home Sweet Home" on your big sister's Casio keyboard. And you know you turn up the iPod when shuffle kicks you into "Dr. Read more »

Torn apart

Control charts the angst of Ian Curtis
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cheryl@sfbg.com

Let's start with the Ian Curtis dance. Part march in place, part ecstatic flail, it conveyed the singer's trancelike connection to Joy Division's music; it also eerily echoed the epileptic seizures he began suffering at age 21, just as his band was becoming famous. Read more »

Dethklok! Dethklok! Dethklok!

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By Duncan Scott Davidson

Dethklok, “the most brutal band in the world” and stars of Adult Swim’s juggernaut of animated murder, Metalocalypse, are on a nationwide tour in support of their recently released Dethalbum (Williams Street), which peaked at number three on the Billboard Hard Rock Album charts and reached number 21 on the Billboard 200, making it the best-selling death metal album of all time. Read more »

India, brothers, the Kinks, and a train

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Hey, Wes Anderson fan – why haven’t you seen The Darjeeling Limited yet? It’s currently playing in both San Francisco and the East Bay, and while it may not capture the genius promised by Anderson’s “My Life, My Card” American Express commercial, it’s still a thoughtful, impeccably stylish look at what happens when three estranged brothers take a train ride across India, stumbling upon moments of spiritual enlightenment, family bonding, and the inevitable slew of life lessons. Read more »

Imitation of life

Grief, love, and plastic mingle in Lars and the Real Girl
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cheryl@sfbg.com

Lonely, socially awkward dude becomes obsessed with an eerily lifelike female doll. Uh, I've seen that movie before, when it was a horror flick called Love Object. But if you can imagine the same plot transferred into a bittersweet romance and with the kink factor dialed way down, you'll have a grip on Lars and the Real Girl, a movie so softhearted it implies the silicone-worshiping misfit in question (Ryan Gosling) doesn't even have sex with his sex doll. They do smooch on occasion, though.

From Craig Gillespie — the director of Mr. Read more »

"Your pet cat"

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People always ask me why I love horror movies so much. That, I can't answer ... though probably for some dark, disturbing psychological reason we needn't speculate upon here. More concrete is when I started getting into horror movies. There was the first time I saw Poltergeist (at a slumber party in fifth grade; a year later, at the sixth-grade slumber party for my own birthday, I gleefully played host to a roomful of terrified classmates as we huddled in my basement, watching Psycho). Read more »

I heart the Heartless Bastards...

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and they heart me too, cause they're playing this weekend's Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival!

Our coverage of the festival here.

Heartless Bastards here:Read more »

Beauty and the beasts

Shock it to me!
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SCREAM QUEEN What kind of a woman tempts both Dracula and Frankenstein? Gorgeous Veronica Carlson, that's who — star of Hammer classics Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968) and Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969). Now an artist and devoted grandmother living in Florida, Carlson's coming to town to share her memories of the golden age of British goth horror as part of this weekend's "Shock It to Me!" film fest. Read more »

SF DocFest: "Breaking Ranks"

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By Kevin Langson

Breaking Ranks, which plays at SF DocFest Oct 2 and 3, will surely be appreciated by anyone still engaged with and infuriated by the war in Iraq. It’s particularly powerful to hear the first hand accounts of US soldiers who have been there and have changed their minds -- and have withdrawn their support from an endeavor they now see as a malicious folly. Read more »