Cheryl Eddy

You need this book.

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Goldies Film winner James T. Hong

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It's rare when a filmmaker is able to match provocative themes with evocative imagery — and do it consistently. Addressing race and class issues in his arrestingly photographed works, James T. Hong is one such artist. His filmography includes Behold the Asian: How One Becomes What One Is (which won a Golden Gate Award at the 2000 San Francisco International Film Festival despite its labeling of dot-com-era San Francisco as "the white asshole paradise") and Taipei 101: A Travelogue of Symptoms (Sensitive Version), an excoriation of white guy–Asian girl couples. Read more »

Goldies Film winners Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer

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Like the steadfast Salton Sea itself, Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer's Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea has displayed remarkable staying power. The first version of the film played at the 2004 San Francisco Documentary Film Festival, one of more than 100 festivals that have screened the doc since its initial release. Read more »

What would Jesus do?

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"I bought it for myself but never used it," he said. "I was tempted, but I never used it." - Ex-National Association of Evangelicals prez (and George W. Bush bud) Ted Haggard to reporters regarding his alleged meth use, 11/03/06

That's kind of like saying he smoked pot but didn't inhale -- except way more hilarious, ain't it?? Read more »

"So good, so quick -- almost unworldly"

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Short notice, but what the hell -- there's an awfully cool doc playing tonight and tomorrow at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on seminal yet underappreciated Boston post-punk band Mission of Burma. Not a Photograph: The Mission of Burma Story, from co-directors David Kleiler, Jr. and Jeff Iwanicki, kicks off as the band is prepping for its first public performance since 1983 -- the New York City show that launched their rapturously received 2002 reunion tour. Read more »

The dark tower

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With Amores Perros and 21 Grams, director Alejandro González Iñárritu (along with screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga) trademarked his filmmaking style: overlapping storylines and characters connected in seemingly random ways; a technical approach that includes gritty locations and hand-held camerawork; and a Big Theme that overarches all. Read more »

The unholiest of holy days

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Miniature candy bars before breakfast, random spashes of fake blood on my Converse, death threats, Misfits on the iPod, Freddy Krueger watch on my wrist ... could be any other Tuesday in my life, really. But hot damn, y'all, it's Halloween!! BOO-ya!

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So, I was up late last night chattin' with Captain Howdy about some of the reasons for the season. The good Cap'n suggested I post some Oct 31-friendly links for your enjoyment. Read more »

Assassin fascination

Death of a President guns for Bush
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cheryl@sfbg.com
Four presidents have been killed in office: the two you hear about (Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy) and the two you kind of don't (James A. Garfield and William McKinley). But any time a political figure meets a violent death, post-traumatic stress can echo through generations — particularly because Hollywood is so fond of assassination cinema. Read more »

Steel Will

An interview with the director of controversial Golden Gate suicide doc The Bridge
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Inspired by Tad Friend's 2003 New Yorker article "Jumpers," filmmaker Eric Steel spent 2004 shooting the Golden Gate Bridge — intentionally capturing the plunges launched from the world's most popular suicide spot. The resulting doc, The Bridge, studies mental illness by filling in the life stories of the deceased through interviews with friends and family members. After playing to packed houses at this year's San Francisco International Film Festival, The Bridge opens for a theatrical run in the city that's perhaps most sensitive to its controversial subject matter. Read more »

Bloody pages of horror!

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Probably the number one question I get asked in life (besides "Yo, Eddy, what the hell is on that sandwich?") is "What's your favorite horror film?" My knee-jerk response is, of course, Halloween -- I'm obsessed with John Carpenter, Donald Pleasence is nothing but fun to watch, and though I have the entire movie memorized, I never, ever get bored of it. Read more »