D. Scot Miller

Ten City

On the lookout for Afro-surrealism at the SF Black Film Festival
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For the last two years I have been trying to plant the term Afro-surreal into the collective unconscious. Unlike Afro-futurism, Afro-surrealism is about the present. In sound it conjures everything from Sun-Ra to Wu-Tang. In speech, it brings you Henry Dumas, Amie Cesaire, Samuel Delaney, and Darius James. In visual realms, the Afro-surreal ranges from Wifredo Lam to Kara Walker to Trenton Doyle Hancock. Afro-surreal stages are set for new productions of Jean Genet's The Blacks (1959), George C. Read more »

Been there, done that

Reading between the beats of Rollin' with Dre
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REVIEW Bruce Williams and Donnell Alexander's Rollin' with Dre (One World/Ballantine, 192 pages, $25) is a strange and sinister book. What makes it strange is that it's actually about Williams, who worked as a bodyguard, valet, personal manager, and confidante for Dr. Dre. It's his biography, not Dre's, so it falls into the category of an insider's tale. Read more »

Black, white, and color

Medicine for Melancholy faces the changing city
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Clip this article. Put it on your refrigerator to remind yourself, your roommates, your friends and family to see Medicine For Melancholy.

The story seems simple. In the aftermath of a party, two 20-something San Franciscans wake up in bed together with no recollection of how they got there. They exchange names at a Noe Valley coffee shop and share a cab in cold silence with no attempt to reconnect. She leaves her wallet behind. He hunts her down online to return it. Read more »