Dennis Harvey

Highway to hell

'Blue Caprice' explores the murky motives of the Beltway snipers

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Provoc-auteur

A multi-venue series highlights edgy filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini

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FILM It still boggles the mind that perhaps the most important single figure in the socio-religiously conservative Italy's artistic media of the 1960s through the mid-'70s — an extraordinarily fertile period, particularly for cinema — was an openly queer Marxist atheist and relentless church critic. Pier Paolo Pasolini stirred innumerable controversies during his life, ending prematurely in his alleged 1975 murder by a teenage hustler. Read more »

Blah lust

Brian De Palma's tame, lame 'Passion'

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Scenes from a marriage

'Cutie and the Boxer' showcases one artistic couple's functional dysfunction

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FILM At least since Grey Gardens in 1975 provided a peek at mother-and daughter eccentrics living in squalor — distinguished from your average crazy cat ladies by being closely related to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis — there's been a documentary subgenre devoted to, well, weirdos. Errol Morris and Werner Herzog have devoted a sizable chunk of their output to them, those people who might make you nervous or annoyed if they lived next door but are fascinating to gawk at for 90 minutes or so. Read more »

Reel to real

Revisiting Shirley Clarke's 1967 'Portrait of Jason'

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Catch a falling star

Paul Schrader talks celebrity, post-theatrical cinema, and 'The Canyons'

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Now that "train wreck" is an official celebrity category popular media ignores at its peril, certain people and projects are deemed doomed automatically. Lindsay Lohan can't redeem herself — she'd lose her entertainment value by regaining any respect. Ergo, The Canyons — the first theatrical feature she's starred in since 2007, the year of triple A-bombs Georgia Rule, Chapter 27, and I Know Who Killed Me — was earmarked as a disaster from the outset.Read more »

Downwardly mobile

Woody Allen's highly anticipated 'Blue Jasmine' has less San Francisco in it than expected — but it's still his best film in years

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Hysterical blindness

A false accusation devastates a man and his community in 'The Hunt'

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Mads Mikkelsen has the kind of face that is at once strikingly handsome and unconventional enough to get him typecast in villain roles. (A good Hollywood parallel would be Jack Palance in his prime — they've got the same vaguely Slavic features, with sharp cheekbones and narrow eyes.)Read more »

Live to tell

A new doc unearths long-lost Detroit band Death

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Father's day

Alysia Abbott pays tribute to the gay, single-parent dad who raised her in bohemian SF

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arts@sfbg.com

LIT In late-1980s San Francisco, Steve Abbott hosted a gay writer's workshop at his small apartment at the fabled corner of Haight and Ashbury. One fleeting but reliable occurrence was an appearance by Alysia, the daughter he'd raised since his wife died in a car accident years earlier.Read more »