Erik Morse

Locus Solus

Guy Maddin on interior space, hair-dryers, and orange Jell-o
|
()

"Even a minor event in the life of a child is an event of that child's world and thus a world event," declares Gaston Bachelard in his 1958 phenomenology of domesticity, The Poetics of Space. In its attempts to reconcile a science of atomic futurism with visions of quotidian psychology, to link the aberrations and fetishes of modern design with the traditions of hearth and home, Bachelard's unique poetics are largely identical to the cinematic worlds of Guy Maddin. Read more »

Listening deeply to future's past

Autechre skitters between the post-classical, the plug-in, and the dance floor
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

With this month's release of Quaristice (Warp), Manchester electro pioneers Autechre have proven once again why they remain the most vital experimental force of the Warp generation invoking, in their dance-floor songscapes, a considerable 50-year palimpsest of hermetic sounds, from classical avant-garde to fin de millénaire techno. Read more »

"Protest in Paris 1968: Photographs by Serge Hambourg"

America wasn't the only place that wanted a revolution
|
()

REVIEW While most Americans equate 1968 as the ground zero of political tumult in Chicago, New York City, and throughout the South, the revolutions that spread across Europe that year were of equal historical importance. Largely a reaction to the political asphyxiation of post–World War II policy and a much larger rejection of the feudal monarchist, industrial-capitalist, and communist regimes that had subjugated the masses for many years, the continent was suddenly positioned at the precipice of deconstruction. Read more »

"Friedlander"

A personal obsession with traveling and shooting the country
|
()

REVIEW Throughout Lee Friedlander's 50-year oeuvre, much of which is now on display at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the photographer has been lauded for his liveliness, optimism, and mobility. Yet his paean to modern Americana often resembles monochrome memento mori. Taken as a whole, Friedlander's work has always seemed driven to two poles: the ephemeral and the haunting. Read more »

Lee Friedlander's lively American necrologies

A personal obsession with travel in "Friedlander"
|
()

REVIEW Throughout Lee Friedlander's 50-year oeuvre, much of which is now on display at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the photographer has been lauded for his liveliness, optimism, and mobility. Yet his paean to modern Americana often resembles monochrome memento mori. Taken as a whole, Friedlander's work has always seemed driven to two poles: the ephemeral and the haunting. Read more »

Years of Lead

Autonomia revisits Italy post-'68
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

REVIEW Reflecting on his work on millenarian Europe, the autonomist and political philosopher Antonio Negri stated, "This is certainly one of the central and most urgent political paradoxes of our time: in our much-celebrated age of communication, struggles have become all but incommunicable."

Long an influential campaign in Negri's native Italy, autonomia, or self-rule, has received little critical attention from the English-speaking world. Read more »

Great Scott!

One hundred years of Raymond Scott's exotica genius
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Though orchestra leader and electronics pioneer Raymond Scott may not exactly have been a household name, his sonic inventiveness succeeded in seeping across the larger social synapse of America's television generation. Read more »

Year in Music: Bliss you

Post-rock icons Seefeel made one of the most obsession-worthy albums of the '90s -- and 2007
|
()

"It was definitely Kevin Shields — it was his playing that made me want to play guitar in a different way," explains Mark Clifford, former guitarist and studio mastermind of United Kingdom electro innovators Seefeel. Read more »

Bubblegum and barbed wire kisses

The Jesus and Mary Chain resurrected
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Somehow it seems morbidly appropriate that a band like the Jesus and Mary Chain would reappear in a year that has witnessed the sad demise of country tunesmith and pop maverick Lee Hazlewood and the grisly murder trial of überproducer and pop maverick Phil Spector. Siblings straight from a David Cronenberg film, William and Jim Reid had an obsession with classic pop music matched only bya lugubrious death drive. Read more »