Guardian Editorial

East Bay endorsements 2010

There are plenty of important races and issues on the ballot in the East Bay. Here are our endorsements for Berkeley and Oakland

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BART BOARD DISTRICT 4

ROBERT RABURN

Incumbent Carole Ward Allen has been a disappointment, part of the moribund BART establishment that wastes money on pointless extensions, ignores urban cores, and can't control its own police force. Robert Raburn, a bicycle activist with a PhD in transportation and urban geography, would be a great replacement. If he's elected, and Bert Hill wins in San Francisco, BART will have two more progressive transit activists to join Tom Radulovich. Vote for Raburn.

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ENDORSEMENTS 2010

Walker, Mandelman, and Kelly for supervisor. No, no, no on B. Yes, yes, yes on 19. Our complete endorsements for San Francisco, state, and national races

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On every level — federal, state and local — the Nov. 2 election is critical. Californians will decide whether a billionaire with no political experience and a failed business executive with right-wing views should be the next governor and senator. They'll address a long list of major ballot measures. In San Francisco, voters will decide the balance of power on the Board of Supervisors, weigh in on ballot measures that could deeply affect the local budget, and decide whether this city wants to allow a harsh crackdown on the homeless.Read more »

Endorsements 2010: San Francisco candidates

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SUPERVISOR, DISTRICT 2

JANET REILLY

Frankly, we were a little surprised by the Janet Reilly who came in to give us her pitch as a District 2 supervisorial candidate. The last time we met with her, she was a strong progressive running for state Assembly as an advocate of single-payer health care. She was challenging Fiona Ma from the left, and easily won our endorsement.Read more »

Endorsements 2010: State ballot measures

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PROP. 19

LEGALIZE MARIJUANARead more »

Endorsements 2010: State races

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GOVERNOR

EDMUND G. BROWN

We have issues with Jerry Brown. The one-time environmental leader who left an admirable progressive legacy his first time in the governor's office (including the Agricultural Labor Relations Board, the California Conservation Corps, and the liberal Rose Bird Supreme Court) and who is willing to stand up and oppose the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant has become a centrist, tough-on-crime, no-new-taxes candidate. And his only solution to the state budget problems is to bring all the players together early and start talking.Read more »

Endorsements 2010: National races

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 U.S. SENATE

BARBARA BOXER

The San Francisco Chronicle made a stunning — and utterly irresponsible — statement when it refused to endorse either candidate in this race, saying that neither Boxer, the three-term incumbent, nor challenger Carly Fiornia, was qualified for the job. That's insane — this one's as clear and obvious a choice as you could ask for in American politics.Read more »

Needed: a public health master plan

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California Pacific Medical Center's plan to build a massive new regional hospital on Van Ness shouldn't be under the jurisdiction of the Planning Commission

EDITORIAL More than 100 people showed up at the Planning Commission Sept. 23 to oppose California Pacific Medical Center's plan to build a massive new regional hospital on Van Ness Avenue. Most were neighborhood residents who raised an excellent point: what, exactly, would the shiny new $2.5 billion hospital offer for low-income people in the Tenderloin?

And that's just the starting point for discussion. The new project is a piece of a much larger plan: CPMC wants to shut down part of its Laurel Heights campus, reduce the number of beds and the scope of service at St. Luke's, turn Ralph K. Davis into a specialty facility, and reshape the way health care is provided in San Francisco.

That's a huge deal — but right now, the city is looking at the projects piecemeal. That's poor public health policy and poor land-use planning. In fact, there's no real way to evaluate the Van Ness hospital in its proper context — the Planning Commission, which will rule on the development issues, is hardly the best venue in which to discuss the future of health care in San Francisco.

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Needed: a public health master plan

California Pacific Medical Center's plan to build a massive new regional hospital on Van Ness shouldn't be under the jurisdiction of the Planning Commission
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EDITORIAL More than 100 people showed up at the Planning Commission Sept. 23 to oppose California Pacific Medical Center's plan to build a massive new regional hospital on Van Ness Avenue. Most were neighborhood residents who raised an excellent point: what, exactly, would the shiny new $2.5 billion hospital offer for low-income people in the Tenderloin? Read more »

Subpoena PG&E's maps

The city needs to be moving on every front to find out exactly where all of PG&E's hazardous infrastructure is
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EDITORIAL If you're worried about the safety of the natural gas mains running below San Francisco — and you should be — you might take a look at a city on the Peninsula, one about 22 miles south of the site of the gas explosion in San Bruno. Since 1927, the city of Palo Alto has been running its own gas and electric utility — and instead of worrying about pipelines blowing up, the city recently won an award for safety. Read more »