Guardian Editorial

The challenges for President Chiu

The new supe head needs to show that he's more than a compromise candidate and that he has the ability to lead the board and promote the progressive agenda
|
()

EDITORIAL The ascension of Sup. David Chiu to the presidency of the Board of Supervisors gives a relative political newcomer considerable power. It also puts Chiu in position to carry on the legacy of Aaron Peskin and lead the opposition to Mayor Gavin Newsom's pro-downtown, pro-Pacific Gas and Electric Co. agenda. Chiu, obviously, lacks the experience Peskin brought to the job, so he needs to move carefully at first. Read more »

Another BART police tragedy

How many more people have to die before BART gets its act together?
|
()

EDITORIAL The video isn't the highest quality — it was taken on a cell phone — but it's pretty simple to figure out what's happening. A young man named Oscar Grant is lying on the ground on a BART train platform, surrounded by BART cops. His hands are behind him, and the police have him completely under control.

Grant was one of a group of young men who had been removed from the train and arrested after reports of a fight early in the morning on New Year's Day. Read more »

The next board president

Our clear choice for the crucial position is ...
|
()

EDITORIAL We've had our fights with Aaron Peskin. He's been on the wrong side of some key votes and issues, and he's had a penchant for political games. But on balance, he's been a good Board of Supervisors president. Read more »

A flawed energy bill

Who's going to control the local electric grid, and thus the city's energy future?
|
()

EDITORIAL Two months after Pacific Gas and Electric Co. spent $10 million to defeat a clean energy measure on the San Francisco ballot, Sup. Sophie Maxwell has stepped into the battle, introducing a mild ordinance that lifts some of the language from the Clean Energy Act but would accomplish very little. We're glad to see Maxwell stepping up her efforts to close the dirty Mirant Power Plant in Potrero Hill, but her legislation needs some significant amendments.

Maxwell's ordinance, cosponsored by Sup. Read more »

Beyond the bloody cuts

This is no time for modest, cautious proposals. The budget situation is alarming
|
()

EDITORIAL There's actually a bright side to the brutally depressing budget struggles in San Francisco and Sacramento. This could be the year Californians finally start to recognize that they can't have a functioning state, with the services everyone wants, without paying taxes. Read more »

Making the Transbay Terminal work

Building an adequate terminal for high-speed rail at its present location would cost at least $750 million, money that would be better spent funding the downtown extensio
|
()

EDITORIAL The Transbay Terminal project is way too important to get bogged down in a pointless political fight. But that's what's going on — and it's the responsibility of the terminal project director, Maria Ayerdi-Kaplan, to put an end to it.

Ten years from now, the terminal is supposed to be a centerpiece in the city's transportation infrastructure. Buses from around the Bay Area will pick up and unload passengers upstairs, while Caltrain and the new high-speed trains from Los Angeles stop below ground. Read more »

Stop PG&E's corporate welfare

The best way to boost the business climate in this recession era is to promote consumer spending
|
()

EDITORIAL Just in time for the holiday season — and the colder weather — Pacific Gas and Electric Co. Read more »

Fueling change

The water board can stop Mirant
|
()

EDITORIAL As a lame duck Board of Supervisors winds down, and the economic crisis and bloody budget cuts absorb most of the political focus at City Hall, there's a major environmental issue creeping toward a January deadline — and city officials need to present a united front.

At issue is the Mirant power plant in Potrero Hill, an aging fossil fuel dinosaur that has been belching pollution into the southeastern part of the city for years. Read more »

Clean energy

The next moves
|
()

EDITORIAL Pacific Gas and Electric Co., its political hacks, and to a great extent, the San Francisco Chronicle all seem to take the same line on the defeat of Proposition H: It's done. The people have spoken. Read more »

Fighting Newsom's mid-year cuts

The mayor shouldn't be driving the fiscal agenda alone
|
()

EDITORIAL If Mayor Gavin Newsom moves forward aggressively with mid-year cuts to the city budget, a lame duck Board of Supervisors with four veterans — including the board president and chair of the Budget Committee — on their way out the door could be voting on harsh reductions in city spending on health care, parks, and other services. That's not the best way to make policy; we'd rather the cuts go to the new board, which will be dealing with next year's budget anyway. Read more »