Guardian Staff Writers

Snap Sounds

The fall albums we've been playing on a loop

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Fall films to look forward too ... and new movies to see tonight!

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Click this way for my Fall Film Preview, presented as part of this weeks Fall Arts spectacular. With bonus photo of Bradley Cooper's Brady perm!

Read on for this week's openings, including one of the best indie films of the year, the latest from Wong Kar-Wai, and, uh...the One Direction movie.

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The robot apocalypse, Mr. Darcy, outlaws, and revolutionaries: new movies!

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Let's Boo-Boo! Edgar Wright's latest bromance-in-genre-clothing, The World's End, opens today, and it's a riot. Elsewhere, there's a rom-com about Jane Austen obsessives, Hollywood's latest supernatural-teen fantasy, and an indie horror flick critic Dennis Harvey calls "a very bloody good ride." (Check out those reviews below).

Longer features this week include my interview with director David Lowery about his neo-Western Ain't Them Bodies Saints, and Harvey's take on artist-couple doc Cutie and the Boxer. Read more »

Never enough hours in the weekend to see all these NEW MOVIES

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Quite a few openings this week, although it seems like 10-plus new movies is becoming the norm these days. (At least there's no big film festival to distract you from the regular ol' cinema at the moment.) In the spirit of efficiency I did a combo-platter review of sci-fi chiller Europa Report; Johnnie To's latest, Drug War; Tenebre, a 1982 Dario Argento giallo that's screening at the Roxie tonight; and doc Adjust Your Tracking: The Untold Story of the VHS Collector, which plays the Balboa. Also at length, Dennis Harvey takes a look at Shirley Clarke's freshly restored 1967 doc Portrait of Jason, also screening at the Roxie.

Ain't enough for you? Read on for Kick-Ass 2, Jobs, and more on the week's fresh crop of flicks.

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Shareable, smearable

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After writing critically about problems in the business models of so-called "shareable economy" companies in last week's issue — including our cover story on Airbnb and other companies that facilitate short-term home rentals ("Into thin air") and a story on the rideshare company Lyft ("Driven to take risks") — the topic continued to dominate the sfbg.com Politics blog, with fresh posts Read more »

Guiding the Guardian

Community forum and reader input help launch a new era

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On July 31, we at the San Francisco Bay Guardian came face-to-face with living proof of something we've long understood perfectly: Our readers are not a shy bunch.

Discerning denizens of sfbg.com and inky-fingered print readers aren't just unafraid to tell it like it is — they also care about the future of San Francisco and the wider Bay Area. You might call them real, live, informed and engaged citizens.Read more »

Woody does SF in "Blue Jasmine" ... plus more new movies!

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Remember that brief, exciting period last year when Woody Allen sightings were being breathlessly reported on 'round town, particularly in the Mission? Here's your chance to see Allen's take on San Francisco (it ain't exactly glossy) in Blue Jasmine, which boasts a stellar performance by likely Oscar nominee Cate Blanchett as someone you would not want to have as a houseguest. Dennis Harvey's take on the film here.

Also opening today: a doc about Napster, a so-so biopic of political theorist Hannah "Banality of Evil" Arendt, an action flick for Denzel Washington completists, and likely Oscar nominee (um...) Smurfs 2. What can I say...if you're not a Woody Allen fan, it's kind of a slower week. Read on for short reviews.

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SF Jewish Film Festival, Hugh Jackman, killer whales, and more: new movies!

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This week: the 33rd San Francisco Jewish Film Festival takes off with screenings all over the Bay Area; check out my take on some of the documentary selections here. Also, the harrowing documentary Blackfish opens, a film that will make you never want to visit SeaWorld again (with good reason). My interview with the film's director, Gabriela Cowperthwaite, here.

Elsewhere, Hollywood hopes you're ready for yet more claw-bearing Hugh Jackman (in The Wolverine), Danish actor Mads Mikklesen shines as a falsely-accused man in The Hunt; indie darling Andrew Bujalski delivers what may be his finest film to date with Computer Chess; a majorly great/bad/quotable/mind-blowing cult film plays the Clay's midnight series; and more. Read on for our short takes.

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Silent films, racing snails, haunted houses, and more in weekend movies!

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Those long, well-dressed lines wrapping around the Castro Theatre signal the advent of the annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival, now in its 18th year and popular as ever. Though the fest opened last night, programming continues through the weekend; check out my take on some of the films (including one of tonight's selections, 1928 rom-com The Patsy) here.

Elsewhere, in first-run and rep theaters, it's a robust week for openings. There's something for nearly every age and appetite (plus a few recommendations on what to avoid) in the short reviews below.

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'Fruitvale Station' opens! Plus, giant monsters, giant robots, and more new movies!

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This week marks the opening of Ryan Coogler's Fruitvale Station, a moving look at Oscar Grant's final hours; it's an especially important film for Bay Area residents, but will likely have nationwide impact. Check out my interview with rookie writer-director Ryan Coogler here.

And, as always, there's more. SO MUCH MORE. Emily Savage writes about Peaches Christ's campy, vampy, celeb-filled tribute (Sat/13 at the Castro!) to 1996 cult classic The Craft here.

PLUS! Pacific Rim's giant robot vs. giant monster smackdown, a 3D surfing doc, and all the rest, after the jump.

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