G.W. Schulz

Wired magazine wins

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

As we’ve reported online, federal Judge Susan Illston has largely ruled in favor of the Guardian and Media Alliance and has opened several documents originally filed under seal in Clint Reilly’s civil suit alleging that the Hearst Corp. and MediaNews Group are conspiring to monopolize the Bay Area’s newspaper market. Read more »

CoCo Times editor moves on

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

Looks like former Contra Costa Times editor Chris Lopez has at least found some part-time work blogging for NewAssignment.net. His most recent entries highlight technological innovations at some of the nation's big dailies, including a video obituary of Art Buchwald that appeared on the New York Times Web site.

An early January post notes that the McClatchy chain of newspapers, which owns the Sacramento Bee, has purchased the "Famous" blogs, including FresnoFamous.com and ModestoFamous.com. Read more »

Fun with whistleblowers!

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

Every six months or so, the San Francisco Controller’s Office releases a summary of the numerous whistleblower complaints it receives from citizens and municipal employees alike.

No names are attached, unfortunately. And attempts by the Guardian in the past to obtain details of the complaints and resulting investigations through sunshine requests were rebuffed by the controller. Read more »

Off the record

Billion-dollar software company Mercury Interactive wants to keep details of a backdating scandal under seal
|
()

gwschulz@sfbg.com

Among the mansions and box stores popuutf8g Silicon Valley are several major tech firms at the heart of a stock option backdating scandal that has metastasized through corporate America over the last two years.

The hall of shame includes Juniper Networks, McAfee, Nvidia, Brocade Communications Systems, and most notably for this story, a Mountain View–based firm called Mercury Interactive, which came under scrutiny in late 2004, making it one of the earliest companies identified for allegedly tampering with the lucrative stock options given Read more »

OCC DIRECTOR KEVIN ALLEN RESIGNS

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

The head of the city's police watchdog agency announced at a San Francisco Police Commission meeting last night that he would be resigning his post in early February. The Office of Citizen Complaints is one of the few city entities in the nation that independently investigates charges of police misconduct from civilians and maintains the power to subpoena officers. Read more »

Cute and cuddly crime statistics

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

Sorry to piss on everybody’s parade, but a slight drop in the homicide rate isn’t exactly an excuse to break out the coke and booze. Then again, it doesn’t take much to get the frat brothers in the mayor’s office amped up for a party. Bro.

With murders down slightly in 2006 compared to the previous year, Gavin Newsom is preparing for a walk down Divisadero with Police Chief Heather Fong, an area where cops say crime has dropped. Read more »

Apple knowingly falsified documents. And that is a crime.

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

So let's get this straight. In 2001, Bay Area-based Apple Computer Inc. gave 7.5 million stock options to its CEO, Steve Jobs. The options were approved by the company's board of directors at a meeting that never actually happened. Read more »

No reprieve

|
()

By G.W. Schulz

The most recent newsletter from the Tenderloin police station shows yet again what has been one of California’s worst criminal-justice problems – recidivism.

California has one of the highest recidivism rates in the country, an ongoing crisis that has remained a vexing political issue for the governator. We love putting people behind bars over and over again, and nowhere in San Francisco is that more startlingly clear than in the Tenderloin, which alone boasted 4,200 arrests last year, the highest in the city. Read more »

The bigger picture

There's a lot more to the McKesson-Hearst story than the press has seen fit to print
|
()

Considering the potential impacts of the First DataBank litigation, which easily reach the billions of dollars, and the evidence that two companies with big footprints in San Francisco (Hearst, which owns the Chronicle, and McKesson, one of the city's biggest corporations) may have conspired to cheat consumers, this story has gotten very little press coverage.

And the news reports that have run have missed some major points.

The suit, brought by a group of unions scattered over the northeastern United States, charges that McKesson Corp, and First DataBank, a publication owned by Hearst, cons Read more »

Judge blocks newspaper monopoly

Judge blocks newspaper monopoly: Hearst, Singleton barred from joint business deals
|
()

@@http://www.sfbg.com/blogs/politics/@@