Johnny Ray Huston

Time-traveling flirtation of the day, week, month...

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Lucio Battisti circa 1970 and 1971, I have a big crush on you. When time travel goes into effect, please meet me and some friends within the fucking great and gorgeous music of your Amore E Non Amore and Umanamente Uomo: Il Sogno.

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Kirby Dominant

Starr: The Contemplations of a Dominator
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KIRBY DOMINANT

Starr: The Contemplations of a Dominator

(Rapitalism)

In a moment when Bay Area hip-hop is synonymous with hyphy in most people's minds, it's radio-shock savvy of Kirby Dominant to throw down a solo effort that follows no trends while his Niggaz and White Girlz project with Chris Sinister continues to generate word of mouth. Read more »

New wave on the tracks

Kirb and Chris seduce all the Molly Ringwalds with the truth on Niggaz and White Girlz
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johnny@sfbg.com

Hip-hop's maze is infinite in size, shape, and perspective, but sometimes MCs get trapped at an impasse and start repeating each other like a gaggle of parrots. During times like that — times like now — it takes imaginative minds to break through and open new verbal doors. Read more »

Fireworks and smoke

A song of love -- that answers one with Anger?
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johnny@sfbg.com

Kenneth Anger and Jean Genet are two greats with outlaw tastes that still taste salty together. So a viewer discovers via a program that marries — for two nights — this pair of master onanists. In compiling the showcase, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts film curator Joel Shepard follows in famous fancy footsteps — none other than Jean Cocteau once showed both Anger's 1947 Fireworks and Genet's 1950 Un Chant d'Amour at an event called the Festival of the Damned Film. Read more »

Alexis Tioseco's Favorite SEA Films of 2006

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Alexis A. Tioseco, editor-in-chief of the superb site Criticine, contributed a manifesto/essay to the Guardian's 2006 film issue. He's also compiled an annotated list of favorite films from Southeast Asia, which cites a number of emerging filmmakers, including the intriguing Edwin. Read more »

Guillermo Del Toro on eggs, ghost sightings, lucid dreaming, Catholicism, the "supranatural," uterine imagery and more

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Now is the time to see Pan's Labyrinth -- and to read Sara Schieron's interview with the man behind the movie, Guillermo Del Toro.

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Guillermo Del Toro

Gleamy-eyed as Santa Claus and every bit as generous, Guillermo del Toro recently visited SF to discuss his latest film, Pan’s Labyrinth. Already seen by droves of festivalgoers, Pan’s Labyrinth is worthy of profound praise. Read more »

DVD-Arrr! Jason Shamai's Mexico City Pirate Diary...Uncut!

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One highlight of this week's 2006 Film opus is Jason Shamai's tale of DVD buying and watching in Mexico City. Read more »

Scent as identity: A conversation with Perfume director Tom Tykwer

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Tom Tykwer's film version of the cult novel Perfume: The Story of a Murderer hits screens this week. Sara Schieron recently talked with the director:

Peter Süskind’s 1985 novel Perfume: The Story of a Murderer has inspired a lot of musical adaptations. German band Rammstein and Portugese band Moonspell have both called the book an influence, and Kurt Cobain, who named the book as his favorite, wrote the song "Scentless Apprentice" in reaction to it. Read more »

Super visions: the year in film

Take a long look at the Guardian's 2006 film issue
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johnny@sfbg.com

The end of each year brings a blitz of polls tabuutf8g the best movies and music of the past 12 months. These monster projects spit up a ton of fun lists, but in terms of science or revelatory truth, they range from suspect to useless. In contrast, the Guardian's annual end of the year film issue gives ideas and opinions precedence over bogus math. Read more »

Girls and monsters

Pan's Labyrinth is almost as fantastic as it is fantastical
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johnny@sfbg.com

Impish skittering insect fairies, horned Jean Cocteau–<\d>spawned romantic beasts, lascivious frogs that make Jabba the Hutt seem schooled by Jenny Craig, and murderous monsters with hands on their eyes — no doubt about it, the baroque and neo-Raphaelite splendor (or Splenda, since it's largely CGI-based) of Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth leaves the majority of 2006's unimpressive prestige movies looking drab and mechanical. Read more »