Johnny Ray Huston

Deadly cure

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He may have the world's largest collection of Kim Wilde posters on his apartment walls, but caterpillar-browed Mr. Lazarescu (Ion Fiscuteanu) is no kid in America: He's an aging drunk in Romania with a ruined liver and a rupturing brain. And Bucharest on a Saturday night is no place to be when you've got the headache and stomachache from hell — in fact, its medical system is a many-leveled modern day approximation of exactly that infernal pit, which is probably why the first name of the title character in Christi Puiu's The Death of Mr. Read more »

Calleth he, calleth I

The Ark's 21st-century rock star Ola Salo does his thing, shoots, and scores
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When I reach the Ark's rock idol Ola Salo on the phone at his apartment in Malmö, Sweden, he's getting ready to meet friends to watch his country's team take on Paraguay in the World Cup. Sheer lack of time calls for forward gestures, so I ask him to describe his boudoir, a CD- and book-strewn "one and a half" room apartment. "It looks like a pretty storage room," he says, amusedly. "I have a plastic chandelier. I've got my big black piano and my black angel wings. Read more »

Meth-y behavior

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Perhaps a good indicator of a social problem's gravity is the number of documentaries it inspires. This year crystal meth addiction, specifically in gay urban communities, brings us two, Meth (Todd Ahlberg, 2005; Fri/16, 3 p.m., Castro) and Rock Bottom: Gay Men and Meth (Jay Corcoran, 2006; Sat/17, 1:15 p.m., Victoria). Watching two treatments certainly seems like a good way to get to the truth — what might be downplayed in one can achieve its rightful resonance with reiteration in the other. Read more »

Light after darkness

Jenni Olson excavates the film life of late SF icon Weldon Kees
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Honeycomb hideout

V??ctor Erice's dreamy allegory The Spirit of the Beehive still stings today
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johnny@sfbg.com

Cast a spell that is what movies (at least nondocumentary ones) are or were supposed to do, and yet how often do they achieve that aim today? V??ctor Erice's original feature, 1973's The Spirit of the Beehive, is partly about the spell a masterful movie can cast, and also is a many-shaded masterpiece that casts an unforgettable spell, a waking dream that disperses in a way that seems to infect the world outside the darkened rooms in which it breathes and lives.Read more »

My crones sleep alone

4: berserk reasons to believe in Russian cinema, if not society
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johnny@sfbg.com

Drop Marina (Marina Vochenko), one of the three main characters in Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, into Eli Roth's Hostel, and she'd be a Nameless Evil Whore, instead of a leather trench-coated weary Moscow hooker with a wryly crude sense of humor. It's all a matter of perspective, and Roth's even if lampooning American xenophobia is his excuse is boring.Read more »

Doing the Cannes-Cannes

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Gary Meyer of the Balboa is at this year's Cannes Film Festival. Here is the first of his reports from the Croisette and the theater trenches:

Getting there -- No snakes on the plane
The trip to Cannes always starts when I board the plane in San Francisco, looking to see if anyone I know is aboard. The 747 was huge but full exploration didn’t reveal any obvious candidates for the Festival.
Once in Paris things change. Read more »

Brilliant corners

All hail the Dislocated Genius of Chelonis R. Jones's electronic soul
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johnny@sfbg.com In the last year of the 20th century, Kodwo Eshun charted musical forms of Afrofuturism in the book More Brilliant than the Sun. Six years into the 21st century, I wonder what Eshun would think of Chelonis R. Jones.

"Camera! Lights! Action!" The words at the very beginning of Jones's debut Dislocated Genius herald an ambivalent performance. "I didn't want to burn it now, burn cork to dance and sing," he soon recites with lack of affect over a marching beat.

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Arctic vessels

Matthew Barney serves up cold fish in Drawing Restraint 9
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johnny@sfbg.com

The significance of a different numeral is noted near the finale, but the number in the title of Matthew Barney's Drawing Restraint 9 makes it clear that the film is but one chapter within a gargantuan project that Barney has been working on for close to two decades, the first seven entries an array of vitrines and video installations predating and possibly even anticipating his Cremaster cycle. Read more »

Festival decompress

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The last few days of the San Francisco International Film Festival usually have a calmer quality, perhaps even more so this year, in the wake of a second weekend “Super Saturday” that bounced from big events such as talks with Jean-Claude Carriere and Tilda Swinton to the wild 'round-midnight screening of the cave-expedition-gone-horribly-wrong nightmare The Descent. Read more »