Johnny Ray Huston

Delorean is pulling for Rafa

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Soon I'll be posting my interview with Ekhi Lopetegi of the Barcelona group Delorean, whose new album Subiza might be the year's most resplendent. Lopetegi had things to say about luminsecent atmosphere, building songs from vocal samples, the greatness of Prefab Sprout, the rewards and dangers of love, and the rude brilliance of New Order, as well as the looseness of Barcelona's community of musicians. But for the sake of timeliness, I'm posting his thoughts on Rafael Nadal, before Nadal faces his arch-nemesis and the only player to have beaten him at Roland Garros, Robin Soderling, in the Sunday final of the French Open.

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Snap Sounds: Kisses

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To name a song “Midnight Lover” is ambitious, and perhaps dangerous. A song with a title so classically charged with sex and romance had better deliver. Luckily, this track from Kisses' upcoming album Heart of the Nightlife (Surround Sound) possesses enough swoon-worthiness to compensate for its relative lack of lust. This duo is romantic, and has the disco credentials – love of Cerrone and Gino Soccio; tutelage under Alec R. Constandinos – to deliver the sleek seduction. Read more »

Gay outta Hunters Point

San Francisco music video auteur Justin Kelly makes the move into movies

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Maybe now that Apichatpong "Joe" Weerasethakul has won the Palme d'Or at Cannes, the art film world can be forgiven, but many of my favorite movies of the past few years have been made for Vimeo or YouTube more than for DVD rental, let alone the big screen. I'm thinking of Damon Packard's SpaceDisco One, and most of all, I'm talking about music videos shot right here in San Francisco: Skye Thorstenson's fantasia for Myles Cooper's "Gonna Find Boyfriends Today," and Justin Kelly's numerous videos for Hunx and His Punx. Read more »

Streets of San Francisco: Benjamin Barnes

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Benjamin Barnes is one of the street musicians interviewed within our "Streets of San Francisco" issue. He's played with Mr. Bungle, DJ Disk, and a host of other musicians and bands, and he teaches music. His current group Swindlefish is playing a show on Sunday, May 16 at 2 p.m. at Caffeinated Comics Company. It's the store's first live music show, though they also have karaoke. Treat your eyes to some comics and your ears to some music. Read more »

Streets of San Francisco: Miguel Pendás' Vertigo tour

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Last week I was able to go on Miguel Pendás' Vertigo tour. Creative Director at the San Francisco Film Society, Pendás led a group of ten on a van journey that concluded at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge.

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Space is the place

Another Science Fiction is brought to the page and screen by Megan Prelinger

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LIT/FILM "I'm a lifelong space fan old enough to remember the Apollo era and grow up on Star Trek — when I was little, the Apollo missions and Star Trek merged in my mind," says Megan Prelinger. "I lived my life, but kept one eye on space, watching and waiting to see what would happen. As I got older I realized that the general public is disenfranchised from having an opinion about or experience of space. I thought I could make an intervention — an intervention into space."Read more »

Seasonal, effective

October Country brings something new to film-as-family-portrait
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From Cleveland with love

The wit and wisdom — and sweet and scary melodies — of Baby Dee

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Live on screen

SFIFF: Sam Green teases out Utopia and the possibilities of documentary

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Red, blonde, and blue

SFIFF: Alone again, naturally, in João Pedro Rodrigues' To Die Like a Man

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johnny@sfbg.com

SFIFF The evening breeze caresses the trees tenderly early on in João Pedro Rodrigues's To Die Like a Man. This shift from the furious winds of Rodrigues' Odete (a.k.a. Two Drifters, 2005) is a signal that the director, ever aware of the lexicon he's blooming, is adopting a languid pace. Rodrigues' third feature film isn't immune to irony, a main one being that slow death allows his cinema to breathe most deeply. Read more »