K. Tighe

Our lady of the ivories

Imogen Heap has the keys to the kingdom
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
One part an electric Venus in Furs and one part shipwrecking siren, the woman swirling around the stage has a three-ring circus in her head. There is no doubt about it. Imogen Heap does something to a room.
Captivating presence aside, it's her musicianship that leaves even the most adept of multi-instrumentalists unhinged in disbelief. The 28-year-old songwriter is classically trained on piano, cello, and clarinet; has honed her chops on the drums and guitar; and has even mastered the mbira, Zimbabwe’s thumb piano.
Perhaps most notably, the lady plays a mean Mac. Read more »

Goldies Music winner Gris Gris

|
()

The incredible thing about discovering a genuinely good band is that it has the ability to throw your entire world out of whack.
The Gris Gris are cooler than your older cousin's garage rock band, the one that first introduced you to a world outside of MTV. They're grittier than that home-recorded cassette you bought at your first punk rock show, and they're more revolutionary than the moment you realized it was OK to like the music that your parents listen to. Read more »

What Is Crispin?

Crispin Glover's film What Is It? begs a genius question.
|
()

CULT ICON Over a decade ago a pair of first-time filmmakers approached Crispin Glover to ask if he would act in their movie.
Glover signed on — but to direct, with the condition that most of the roles be filled by actors with Down syndrome. Best known for eccentric fringe roles in films such as River's Edge, Bartleby, Back to the Future, and Rubin and Ed, Glover had written other screenplays involving people with the condition and had kept it in his mind's eye for some time. Read more »

Mall of the metaverse

Rock shows, retail, and rebellion — Second Life brings virtual gaming down to the everyday level
|
()

culture@sfbg.com
Suzanne Vega is waddling across the screen. Well, not the real Suzanne Vega but the quiet folk singer's digital avatar on SecondLife.com. On Aug. 3, she — or it — claimed the proud position of being the first digital representation of a major-label pop star to give a concert in cyberspace. Read more »

Six-string samurai

Oakland metalists Totimoshi hitch their wagon to Page Hamilton and head out
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Discovering new metal bands worth their salt these days isn't just hit-and-miss — it's mostly miss. In fact, most kids now trying to crack the genre make me want to jump onstage, grab them by their greasy hair, and scream, "Satan is boring!" or "You are not Metallica!" into their prematurely damaged eardrums.
So when a friend slipped me the unmastered studio tracks of Totimoshi's forthcoming album, Ladron, I was hesitant. Read more »

Rock's black back pages

Black Fiction take us for a Ride
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
Tim Cohen sits at a table cutting up playing cards.
The Black Fiction vocalist-guitarist-songwriter has convinced himself that the meaty torsos of every jack, queen, and king are spelling out something big. He flings the disembodied heads into a pile and arranges the stately bodies to spell out Black Fiction Ghost Ride. Across the table keyboardist Joe Roberts is gathering the heads. Read more »

Found in translation

John Byrum revisits The Razor's Edge and Bill Murray's dramatic debut
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
In early ’80s Hollywood, director John Byrum set about making a film set in ’20s Paris. Coming down from the nouveau bohemian high of filming 1980's Heart Beat, a film based on Carolyn Cassidy's accounts of Jack Kerouac, Byrum was fully prepared to tickle the underbelly of the poetic avant-garde. He aimed to do so through a film version of W. Somerset Maugham's The Razor's Edge.
The Razor's Edge tells the story of Larry Darrell, a young American who has just returned from war and decided to loaf around Paris to find the meaning of his life. Read more »

Burritos of the gods

Michael Showalter discusses humor, metahumor, sushi, and, er, metasushi
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
SFBG So what inspires you?
MICHAEL SHOWALTER You do, you inspire me.
I think about you in the morning. I doodle little pictures of your face and think about you making me a burrito. Sometimes I doodle little pictures of you making me a burrito.
OK, so maybe that isn't exactly how it goes. Although Showalter is a doodle enthusiast, he is only mildly turned on by baby-size burritos. Being the narcissistic Bay Area dweller that I am, I immediately ask Showalter, who's on the phone from his home in New York City, about San Francisco.
"I like San Francisco. Read more »