Laura Swanbeck

Somers Town

The melting pot mentality that is London
|
()

PREVIEW Black and white photography born out of technical necessity transforms Somers Town into a stark and poignant portrait of the drudgery and displacement of two wayward youths in modern-day England. Tomo (Thomas Turgoose), a cheeky runaway who perhaps in a past life was a Dickensian street urchin, flees Nottingham and hops aboard a train bound for London, seeking refuge from the banality of life in the Midlands. Read more »

Funny People

An interview with Judd Apatow
|
()

INTERVIEW In anticipation of Funny People, about a friendship between a famous comedian (Adam Sandler) who falls ill and a seemingly hopeless rookie (Seth Rogen), I sat down with director Judd Apatow to discuss stand-up, life and death situations, and his early comedic influences.

SFBG This film is a total departure with a terminal illness thrown into the mix. What was your inspiration?

Judd Apatow I just wanted to write something that I cared about. Read more »

Milton Glaser: To Inform and Delight

Paying homage to this humble, erudite, and mirthful man who transcends traditional lines between high art and commercial design
|
()

REVIEW Stroll through New York City and you can't help but stumble onto one of Milton Glaser's iconic designs, be it a Brooklyn Brewery label, New York magazine cover, or even the big white nose perched above Trattoria dell'Arte across from Carnegie Hall. Of course, Glaser, one of the world's most talented, postmodern graphic designers, has also left his stamp, quite literally, with the ubiquitous I Heart NY insignia. Read more »

Munyurangabo

Delving into Rwanda's tragic past, this provocative film wonders if Rwandans can forge new identities unburdened by guilt or vengeance
|
()

REVIEW Don't be deceived by the serene, pastoral setting of Lee Isaac Chung's Munyurangabo (2007), a neorealist drama that follows unlikely friends Sangwa (a Hutu) and Ngabo (a Tutsi) as they journey home nearly a decade after the Rwandan genocide. The film's hauntingly peaceful veneer and desolate beauty speaks to the hundreds of thousands killed on Rwandan soil and belies Sangwa and Ngabo's simmering resentment and shame. Refusing to fixate on the war's carnage, Munyurangabo focuses on its psychological repercussions instead. Read more »