Matt Sussman

Just say no

HAIRY EYEBALL: "Negative Space" at Steven Wolf Fine Arts transforms pessimism into something unexpected

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL Summertime is supposed to be about taking it easy and soaking up good vibes. This is decidedly not the case with "Negative Space," Steven Wolf Fine Arts' current group show that, like an old punk rock mix-tape, delivers one lean, catchy declaration of refusal after another.Read more »

California dreaming

Metal quilts and radical piss-taking marks YBCA's Bay Area Now

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HAIRY EYEBALL In his review of the latest Venice Biennale, Boston Globe art critic Sebastian Smee threw down something of a gauntlet when he wrote, "The received wisdom is that contemporary art is mostly about ideas. In truth, however, it's mostly about gestures."Read more »

A minor place

The Mission school resurfaces with shows by Margaret Kilgallen and Chris Johanson

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HAIRY EYEBALL The painter Margaret Kilgallen died in 2001; she was just 33 years old. A year later, critic Glen Helfand would write in the Guardian ("The Mission School," 7/1/2002) a coming out party for Kilgallen, her husband Barry McGee, and friends such as Chris Johanson and Alicia McCarthy, whose scruffy, heartfelt, and street-influenced art had started to attract a popular following abroad as well as intense interest from beyond the Bay Area art world.Read more »

Fake-out

Stephanie Syjuco plays with the art of plundering, Matt Bryans calls up photography's ghost.

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HAIRY EYEBALL It's not just the title of Stephanie Syjuco's solo show "RAIDERS" — her first at Catharine Clark Gallery — that brings to mind Indiana Jones. Something of the latter-day swashbuckler comes across in Syjuco's art, which, like Indy, initially seems to be playing to all sides for the sake of plunder — when in fact this cleverness is the outward expression of a deeper skepticism toward the very institutions it's engaged with.Read more »

Crying in public

Being brave through site-specific choreography on Market Street 

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HAIRY EYEBALL Weaving my way through the groups of slower moving shoppers and tourists ambling out of the Powell Street BART Station, I realized I was already too late.

I had wanted to be present for the June 11 noon kickoff of Market Day — the large-scale public art event tied to Allison Smith's current Southern Exposure exhibit "The Cries of San Francisco" — but when I reached Mint Plaza and had been handed a schedule I saw that my timing had been off by an hour.Read more »

The faith and the fury

A night with the one and only Klaus Kinski

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The ballad of Peter and Raymond

FRAMELINE FILM FEST: A legendary local odd couple gets its due in Shut Up Little Man! An Audio Misadventure

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Once upon a time (1987 to be exact), two young men who were old friends moved to San Francisco from the Midwest to take in all the big city had to offer. Like many 20-somethings, Eddie Lee "Sausage" and Mitchell "Mitch D" Deprey didn't have a lot of money and wound up living in a somewhat derelict apartment in the Lower Haight with a bright pink exterior they dubbed "the Pepto Bismol Palace." The paint was peeling and the walls were thin but the rent was cheap.Read more »

Art fair city

Can artMRKT and ArtPadSF validate this city's role as a haven for visual arts?

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arts@sfbg.com

HAIRY EYEBALL The booths have been dismantled, countless plastic cups and empty liquor bottles are heading to recycling centers, and the exhibitors have returned to the quiet of their respective white cubes. San Francisco's big, busy art fair weekend has come and gone. By many accounts it was a success for a city that two years ago hadn't had an art fair in almost two decades, even if, in retrospect, it doesn't feel like the lay of the land has been significantly altered.Read more »

Slick

San Francisco plays host to three different art fairs this week

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"Surface, surface, surface." Patrick Bateman' pithy summation of the dominant aesthetic of his times in American Psycho could easily serve as a subtitle for Takeshi Murata's colorful still lifes currently hanging at Ratio 3 (Murata's computer animated short, I, Popeye, which plays in the gallery's backroom, merits less discussion despite its gallows humor).Read more »

The long goodbye

YSL's legacy looms large in L'amour fou

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Pierre Thoretton's documentary L'amour fou opens with two clips of men bidding farewell. The first, from 2002, is of the French-Algerian couturier Yves Saint Laurent announcing his retirement in a moving and emotional speech worthy of his favorite writer Marcel Proust. The second is of Pierre Bergé, Saint Laurent's longtime business partner and former lover, eulogizing his departed friend at the designer's memorial service six years later.Read more »