Max Goldberg

Side of the road

Kelly Reichardt visits Pacific Film Archive for a weekend retrospective

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Wall Street hold 'em

Inside Job indicts the financial sector's role in the economic crisis

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From here, cinema

"Radical Light" surveys a half-century of Bay Area alternative film and video

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I saw my first movie when I was four or five: it was a revival of 101 Dalmations (1961), and I liked it enough to ask my mother if we could sit through it a second time (we did). I saw my second first movie when I was 19: it was a nine-minute short by Bruce Baillie titled Valentin de las Sierras (1967), and after seeing it I knew film history must be full of secrets. Read more »

False witness

Talking with Yael Hersonski about her tactful excavation of a Nazi propaganda film

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Practiced distance

The elements of Paul Clipson's streaming cinema -- showing at SFMOMA

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False witness: Yael Hersonski on "A Film Unfinished"

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Documentaries that “tell” the Holocaust tend to employ archival footage generically as a kind of historical flavoring. It’s rare that we are asked to contemplate either the provenance of the images or the individual lives depicted. Yael Hersonski’s A Film Unfinished simultaneously confronts both of these gaps with a taut historiography of several reels of Nazi propaganda footage. Even in the German film’s inchoate form, we easily apprehend the propagandistic moves to further manipulate an already constructed reality (the Warsaw Ghetto) for objective “proof” of the necessity of Hitler’s Final Solution. And yet here before us, flowing at the speed of life, are the faces and places that would be destroyed within months of the filming.

Hersonski attempts to extricate the documentary value of this footage using frame-speed manipulations and edits which call attention to telling movements. She also films elderly survivors watching the footage alone in a darkened theater. In their capacity for recognition and incredulousness, they unravel the German point-of-view. By weaving these live responses with diary entries of those consigned to the ghetto along with the deposition of a German cameraman, Hersonski draws a fragmentary, highly specific account of the Holocaust’s crisis of representation. We discussed the film in a recent email exchange.

San Francisco Bay Guardian: The question of how to use archival footage responsibly is one that haunts the great Holocaust-themed films — Night and Fog (1955), Shoah (1985), and the films of Péter Forgács all find very different solutions. Can you describe the way your own attitudes regarding the appropriation of this archive developed during the time you worked on A Film Unfinished? Read more »

Dreams untrue

Revisiting Robert Gardner's polarizing ethnographic films

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Strong Weekend

The primeval power trio adds an athletic sense of conflict to shoegaze
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Bringing out the dead

SFJFF docs raise important questions about the Holocaust on film

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Sicily unbound

Celebrating the engaged cinema of Francesco Rosi

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